Samuel Muston

Samuel Muston is deputy editor & food editor of The Independent Magazine. He also writes a weekly food column

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Claw hammered: combine champagne and crustaceans at the Krug and Beast pop-up

Pop-up restaurant Krug & Krustacean offers diners a nip of luxury on London's Southbank

Ah, Krug & Krustacean! A match made in alliterative heaven. Well, maybe not.

Strawberry fields: growing fruit and vegetables on the roof

Garry Hollihead is a chef with a slice of the good life on his hotel roof in London

Walking up London's Northumberland Avenue, you wouldn't know that it was there. Look up and you see only the vast Portland stoned edifices of a Britain at the top of its imperial game. The buildings are, shall we say, unsympathetic; it is about as far from a pastoral vision as it's possible to get. And yet if you could look down on one of the bigger buildings, the Corinthia Hotel, you would see something quite different: a small forest of tomato plants.

Be shaken and stirred at the Royal Academy of Arts' celebration of the martini

Ice-cold, hard as steel, and with the strength of a bull elephant – if ever a drink was deserving of an exhibition, it is the martini. It is the antonymic two-fingers to the sugar-sweet cocktails of the 1990s, and the ever-growing vogue for martinis makes my heart soar. For I believe, as the American essayist HL Mencken said, "a martini is a sonnet in a glass": it is a single boozy idea taken to the limits of alcohol-soaked perfection.

10 best summer fizz

From an English brut to a premier cru Champagne, discover some fine sparklers to drink in the sun this August

Don’t walk: hitting the shops

Beverly Hills: Eating, shopping, celebrity spotting

As the star-studded city celebrates its centenary this year, Samuel Muston investigates why 90210 became America's most desirable postcode
Grape expectations: Rothschild would be a good bet

Samuel Muston: A vinous investment tastes a lot better than most

Once, in a land that now seems very far away indeed, wine merchants had a dictum – buy five cases of five different Bordeaux wine first-growths when your child is born and by the time they marry, you'll be able to pay for the wedding with the profits. It was the closest thing to a psalm that they had.

Hamper your plans: many restaurants now offer picnics

Samuel Muston: My recipe for the perfect picnic

When I am planning a picnic, I immediately think of Ratty and Mole. Their feast in The Wind in the Willows, with its lovely, hunger-inducing "fat, wicker luncheon basket", is just about the high point of outdoor eating in novels.

Hemingway left a full, typed-out recipe for the perfect burger to the John F Kennedy Presidential Library

Samuel Muston: Ernest Hemingway's hamburger is a moveable feast

Writers famously like drinking. Drinking in the morning, drinking in the evening, and possibly drinking themselves into an early grave if they are Dylan Thomas (the day before he died he offered the maid cleaning his room a glass of whiskey; posterity does not relate her reply). It is a trope so well-travelled that it has become almost lore, with people writing entire books about what Hemingway drank in the Ritz and what Amis would put away over lunch at the Garrick.

You're toast: the Kadhai Spiced Crab gourmet toastie from Cinnamon Soho

On The Menu: Gourmet toasties - creative food that we can all afford to eat

The days I spent off school with a cold always started the same way when I was a child – with a loud thud. That was the sound of the ancient toastie maker coming to rest on the kitchen surface, after having been removed by my father from its perch on top of the kitchen cupboards.

The big squeeze: Many people now juice their way to five a day

Samuel Muston: Cold-press juicing equals cold hard cash

When looking for a symbol of how much the cold-press juice business has grown in the past year, one only needs to take a trip to one of the three Selfridges stores around the country. Take, for instance, the Oxford Street shop. Stand outside long enough and you soon notice that among the yellow flashes of the pantone 109 bags, there is something greener in the hands of the sale-goers. Shoppers troop out of the store with little plastic receptacles containing deep green concoctions.

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The phoney war is over

Russian troops and armour pour into Ukraine
Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

The world’s entire food system is under attack - and Britain is most at risk, according to a new study
Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Seoul's plastic surgery industry is booming thanks to the popularity of the K-Pop look
From Mozart to Orson Welles: Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

After the death of Sandy Wilson, 90, who wrote his only hit musical in his twenties, John Walsh wonders what it's like to peak too soon and go on to live a life more ordinary
Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Fears are mounting that Vladimir Putin has instructed hackers to target banks like JP Morgan
Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years

Salomé: A head for seduction

Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years. Now audiences can meet the Biblical femme fatale in two new stage and screen projects
From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic

British Library celebrates all things Gothic

Forthcoming exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination will be the UK's largest ever celebration of Gothic literature
The Hard Rock Café's owners are embroiled in a bitter legal dispute - but is the restaurant chain worth fighting for?

Is the Hard Rock Café worth fighting for?

The restaurant chain's owners are currently embroiled in a bitter legal dispute
Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival

In search of Caribbean soul food

Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival
11 best face powders

11 best face powders

Sweep away shiny skin with our pick of the best pressed and loose powder bases
England vs Norway: Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Lack of Englishmen at leading Premier League clubs leaves manager hamstrung
Angel Di Maria and Cristiano Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

Di Maria and Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

They both inherited the iconic shirt at Old Trafford, but the £59.7m new boy is joining a club in a very different state
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone