Simmy Richman

Simmy Richman is Associate Editor of The Independent on Sunday's New Review magazine. He is also a writer and CD reviews editor for The Independent on Sunday

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Rachel Fannan Twitter photo

The Bonus Track: Rachel Fannan, Melanie de Biasio, Michael Chapman, Jose Gonzalez

Rachel Fannan is a mesmerising performer with a Grace Slick-like pair of lungs

Bradley Knudson posted a video to YouTube which named and shamed a man whose children had been bullying and racially abusing Knudson’s adopted black daughter

Trial by YouTube: Outrage at social media outrage

Next month, the writer and documentary maker Jon Ronson publishes a book called So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. The blurb tells us that Ronson has spent three years interviewing the “recipients of high-profile public shamings. Once their transgression is revealed, outrage circles and the next thing they know they’re being torn apart by an angry mob, sometimes even fired from their job.”

One dating agency, Mutual Attraction, is currently advertising for a “professional Cupid”

Dating agency requires 'professional Cupid': tact required

“This is not a skill that you can learn at university,” says Caroline Brealey, the founder of the Mutual Attraction dating agency, which is currently advertising for a “professional Cupid”. Brealey has so far received more than 100 applications, but will be keeping the vacancy open for any interested readers of this newspaper.

Slipknot UK tour: The band is riding high in the charts - but who exactly are their fans?

The chart-topping nu metal band are touring the UK, scary masks and all. But can a newcomer appreciate their music? Simmy Richman heads for the mosh pit to try to discover their appeal
American artist Joseph Gibbons is currently being held in custody in New York after attempting to hold up a branch of the Chase One bank

Modern art? It's daylight robbery

Though it’s only open to British artists, and they don’t announce the shortlist until May, they might as well call off this year’s Turner Prize and give an honorary award to an American called Joseph Gibbons.

The title of the latest The Decemberists album proved strangely helpful when it came to the writing of this week’s column

After a grim week, some stories to add light to the shade

It has become inevitable that in any week when the news is bleak, newspaper writers who add light to the shade will be castigated by below-the-line commenters. "How can you talk about X in a week when W happened?" they invariably ask. Fair enough. We're a thick-skinned bunch, and in these social-media days everyone's entitled to (and can vent) their opinion.

End of the line: the main entrance to Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, in the village of Brzezinka, Poland

70th anniversary of Auschwitz liberation: 'Why I had to visit this monstrous memorial'

Simmy Richman, who had long believed that visits to the concentration camp were little more than macabre tourism, took a journey that he never thought he'd take
Gwyneth Paltrow and Coldplay's Chris Martin “consciously uncoupled” in March

My best and worst stories of 2014

With this column having been in existence for a smidgen more than 12 months now, it seems right to use the rapidly approaching year's end as an excuse to round up and celebrate some of its more, ahem, memorable people and events.

The first Christmas card: in 1843 the inventor Sir Henry Cole commissioned the artist John Callcott Horsley to draw a card for him to send to family and friends

Hold your temperance: New life for the first Christmas card

It is possible that you are familiar with the story of the first Christmas card. In case not: in 1843 the inventor Sir Henry Cole commissioned the artist John Callcott Horsley to draw a card for him to send to family and friends. The result proved controversial because the British Association for the Promotion of Temperance had just been established and the card depicted a young girl eagerly downing a glass of wine.

Giles Coren, as well as being the restaurant reviewer for The Times, is now a weekly columnist for the London listings magazine Time Out

Named and shamed: How to endear yourself to your new boss

Regular readers of this column (my eldest brother, essentially) might be forgiven for thinking that I am tiny bit obsessed with the writer and television presenter Giles Coren. This is the third time his name has appeared on this page to date, but what's a person to do when he keeps on providing such priceless material?

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine