Simmy Richman

Simmy Richman is Associate Editor of The Independent on Sunday's New Review magazine. He is also a writer and CD reviews editor for The Independent on Sunday

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web
Metro devoted a double-page spread to a book by the American writer Brian Robinson called How to Meet Women on the Subway

The chill of the chase: Overfamiliar on the Underground

In journalism, as in comedy, timing is everything. Chances are that you have seen by now the video of the woman walking down the street in New York and getting more than 100 "catcalls". But while that promotional film for the Hollaback! movement is still getting attention for a variety of reasons, no one seems to have pointed out that the day after the Hollaback! film went viral, the free newspaper Metro devoted a double-page spread to a book by the American writer Brian Robinson called How to Meet Women on the Subway.

It is suggested that entries for the new design “represent Britain in a clear and unambiguous way”

How to apologise for just about everything (with a 'Sorry!' coin of course)

The Royal Mint has asked members of the public to design the 'tails side' of its new £1 coin

Matt Kuleza, left, and coffee #4 with Joshua Poly-Goldschläger. The two have been friends on Facebook since December 2013 after meeting at Meredith Music Festival

Caffeine overload: Shots heard around the world

A few weeks ago Matt Kulesza, a twentysomething from Melbourne, was about to cull some of his Facebook "friends" when he asked himself the following question: "Could I have a coffee with this person?" Inspired by the thought, he decided instead to meet up with the 1,086 people he was connected to through the site and his blog, 1000+ Coffees ("an exercise in remembering to socialise with and get to know people outside the 'Book") was born.

Boris Johnson's speech at the Conservative Party conference

They seek him here… BoJo brought to book at last

From the box marked "What Took Them So Long to Come Up With that Idea?" comes Where's Boris?, a "search-and-find" book (published next month) containing 10 "minutely detailed" scenes with the Mayor of London lurking within. "The book came about because Boris Johnson, love him or loathe him, is a one-of-a-kind," Emma Smith, one of the creators, tells me. "As he's always popping up in comic scenarios (the zipwire moment comes to mind), we thought he deserves a book that turns Boris-spotting into a proper pastime."

Film still from 'The Virginity Hit', 2010

How to be a man: The dangers of being too cool for school

First there Caitlin Moran conquered with How to be a Woman and now Lena Dunham has pitched in with her own guide, Not That Kind of Girl: A young woman tells you what she's 'learned'. Where, you might well ask, are the role-models and advice givers for young men?

Our Space asks for donations from members of the public and uses that money “to buy back billboards” in cities around the world and “replace the ads with positive messages”

Be happy - buy back a billboard

In Confessions of an Advertising Man (1963), David Ogilvy, a founder of Ogilvy & Mather, wrote: "As a private person, I have a passion for landscape, and I have never seen one improved by a billboard." Some 36 years after Ogilvy wrote those words, the Canadian author Naomi Klein used them at the start of her book No Logo, which would go on to sell more than a million copies and become a "manifesto of the anti-corporate movement".

The central concept of Death Row Dinners is an interesting way  to make us think more about our food

Out there: A death row diner, the other musicians taking a leaf out of U2's (i)book and rolling up my CV for a smoking hot job opportunity

Maybe a 'last supper' themed restaurant may make us think more about our food

The Bonus Track: Cymande, Israel Nash, Leonard Cohen

One year and counting

Tokunbo Ajasa-Oluwa, a Social Enterprise Ambassador, was surprised by National Geographic's game, The Underground Railroad: Journey to Freedom

The long walk to understanding slavery

Tokunbo Ajasa-Oluwa is all for educating young black people about their history. In fact, for his work in helping those from “diverse” backgrounds get jobs in the media, Ajasa-Oluwa was appointed a Social Enterprise Ambassador by the Cabinet Office and invited to Downing Street on numerous occasions.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee