Stephen Foley

Stephen Foley is a former Associate Business Editor of The Independent, based in New York. He left in August 2012. In a decade at the paper, he covered personal finance, the UK stock market and the pharmaceuticals industry, and had also been the Business section's share tipster. Between arriving with three suitcases in Manhattan in January 2006 and his departure, he witnessed and reported on a great economic boom turning spectacularly to bust. In March 2009, he was named Business and Finance Journalist of the Year at the British Press Awards.

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Google swings axe at Motorola

The 20,000 employees of Motorola Mobility, the smartphone maker, got a taste of life under their new owner, Google, yesterday, when they were told that one in five of them would lose their jobs.

Boxing clever: Paul Ryan, left, and Mitt Romney at a rally in Ashland, Virginia, yesterday. They promise to rebuild America

Mitt Romney's high-risk gamble ignites race for the White House

Paul Ryan has a plan for the US economy, but many Republicans fear it goes too far, writes Stephen Foley

Stephen Foley: A threat to peace and stability? No, this bank's one of the good guys

US Outlook Standard Chartered was no rogue bank. In fact, it might have been one of the financial institutions that was most helpful to the US Treasury here as America has ratcheted up financial pressure on Iran over the past decade.

Rupert Murdoch slashes value of newspaper empire

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp has scrubbed billions of dollars from the value of its newspaper publishing businesses and promised a big programme of cost cuts over the next year.

Stephen Foley: Sanctions are hurting Iran - but there are ways round them

International sanctions are hurting Iran, but by hook or by crook – and sometimes by US-approved exemption – the country is not frozen entirely out of global trade.

Stephen Foley: The disasters that show why we have to be on our guard with algos

US Outlook Si ves algo, di algo. If you see something, say something. It's written in all the subway cars here in New York City, a reminder we mustn't ignore suspicious packages or suspicious passengers. And as we trundled towards Wall Street station on Wednesday, I couldn't but think of it as a warning to stock-market investors, too. Si ves algo, di "algo".

Stephen Foley: Jobs woe that shines a light on lack of relief

US Outlook No relief for the sluggish US economy this week, not from the Obama administration, not from Congress, not from the Federal Reserve.

Stephen Foley: Abercrombie & Fitch has made the usual mistake

US Outlook A few years ago, every trip I took back to the UK I had to stuff my suitcase full of Abercrombie & Fitch gear to hand out as gifts. The retailer's kind-of-preppy, kind-of-sporty polo shirts were practically a fashion uniform for the folks back in London. Not any more.

Is the dot com bubble about to burst?

Wall Street's love affair with internet stocks has soured after a series of disastrous flotations

Knight Capital fights for its future

Tom Joyce, chief executive of US market making firm Knight Capital, is fighting to save the company after revealing its rogue computer trading programme had caused $440m in losses.

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