Stephen Foley

Stephen Foley is a former Associate Business Editor of The Independent, based in New York. He left in August 2012. In a decade at the paper, he covered personal finance, the UK stock market and the pharmaceuticals industry, and had also been the Business section's share tipster. Between arriving with three suitcases in Manhattan in January 2006 and his departure, he witnessed and reported on a great economic boom turning spectacularly to bust. In March 2009, he was named Business and Finance Journalist of the Year at the British Press Awards.

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Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney spends the weekend with close political friends

Mitt Romney's weekend away with 700 close friends (who happen to be rich)

Running-mate hopefuls jostle for position at lavish event ahead of $6bn election

US teeters on a fiscal cliff edge

The world's biggest economy risks recession unless Congress acts swiftly. Stephen Foley reports from New York

Stephen Foley: Money market funds and the hidden bailouts

US Outlook: The Securities and Exchange Commission revealed this week that it knew of 300 separate occasions where money market funds, an ultra-conservative type of mutual fund that millions of Americans use like they are bank accounts, have had to be quietly bailed out by their sponsoring broker since the products were invented in the Seventies.

Stephen Foley: Fine on the Surface but Ballmer has to tell us why that's entertainment

US Outlook: Memo to Steve Ballmer: it's not the device, it's the ecosystem.

Stephen Foley: Moody's will tighten the vice on bank downgrades

US Outlook: Arbitrary! Backward looking! Completely unwarranted! Complaining by the banks downgraded by Moody's started the second the rating agency's actions hit the wire late on Thursday night. Citigroup sounded especially aggrieved at the two-notch cut to its credit rating, but all the affected institutions rushed out statements to assert that they have never been safer.

Larry Ellison owns a fighter jet, yacht racing team and supercars galore, so what did the billionaire buy next? The Hawaiian island of Lanai

You probably would too if you had $36bn. Not content with a vast collection of toys that spans luxury homes, private jets, lavish cars and cup-winning sailboats, the software mogul Larry Ellison is splashing out on his own paradise island, it has been revealed.

The Spotlight On: Mary Schapiro, chairman, Securities and Exchange Commission

The world's most powerful female regulator?

Federal Reserve 'Twists' again for extra six months

The US Federal Reserve will continue "Operation Twist", its intervention in the credit markets, to push down long-term interest rates for an extra six months.

The Microsoft Surface is far from being an iPad clone

Microsoft Surface: The tablet that's a tonic for the software giant

The software giant's recent launches have tried and failed to match Apple's iPod and iPhone. But it looks to have hit the target with its Surface, the rival to the iPad, which is part laptop and part tablet

The IBM Sequoia becomes the world’s fastest computer,with the ability to complete in one hour calculations that would take 6.7 billion people more than three centuries to carry out

Faster than a speeding petaflop: IBM flies past Japanese rival to win battle of the supercomputers with its Sequoia machine

American firm's Sequoia machine designed to simulate nuclear bomb tests

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003
Barbara Woodward: Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with the growing economic superpower

Our woman in Beijing builds a new relationship

Britain's first female ambassador to China intends to forge strong links with growing economic power
Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer. But the only British soldier to be awarded the Victoria Cross in Afghanistan has both

Courage is rare. True humility is even rarer

Beware of imitations, but the words of the soldier awarded the Victoria Cross were the real thing, says DJ Taylor