Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web
An artist's impression of Kepler-186f which may have conditions suitable to life

Earth 2.0? Astronomers reveal Kepler-186f, the latest planet in a habitable 'Goldilocks zone'

A planet similar in size to Earth with surface temperatures suitable for water to exist in liquid form has been discovered orbiting a distant star in what is the strongest candidate yet for a habitable world outside the Solar System.

A 3D illustration of sperm reaching human egg

The moment of conception: Scientists isolate protein that governs first contact between egg and sperm

The moment of first contact between an egg and a sperm is controlled by a key molecule on the surface of the egg cell that allows it to fuse with a sperm to form a fertilised egg, scientists have discovered.

The three-year study involved 107 married couples who were assessed for their general relationship satisfaction in order to see how happy there were with one another overall

Spoiling for a row? Then check your sugar levels

Couples more likely to have angry rows when hungry, says voodoo-doll test

Intensive logging makes rainforest fires more likely as the Earth warms

Fires could turn Amazon rainforest into a desert as human activity and climate change threaten ‘lungs of the world’, says study

Drying out of the rainforest threatens to ignite the tree-filled habitat – with its rich biodiversity – and convert it almost overnight into barren desert

Scientists in the US used high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the astonishing displays

Fruit flies have evolved to avoid death with 'barrel-rolls' performed 50 times faster than we can blink

Swatting a fly has never been easy and now scientists have found out why – the insect has perfected a cunning, high-speed technique for a quick U-turn.

The report’s authors claim Britain has stockpiled anti-viral influenza drugs that effectively do not work as billed and may cause serious side effects in a significant minority of people

The drugs don't work: Britain wasted £600m of taxpayers' money on useless flu pills stockpiled by Government in case of pandemic

Pharmaceutical giants failed to disclose crucial data revealing concerns over their products Tamiflu and Relenza

A dermatologist detecting the presence of melanoma on the skin

Radical new skin cancer treatment shows promise in first clinical trials

A radical new form of cancer treatment that relies on the body’s natural “killer cells” to attack tumours has proved a success in the first clinical trials on patients suffering from advanced skin cancer, scientists have said.

Children brought up in severely deprived backgrounds are more likely to show ageing in their chromosomes compared to more privileged children, according to a new study

Telomeres: harsh childhood 'makes chromosomes age early'

One implication of study could be that chronic stress in early life could lead to shorter-than-expected lifespan for some boys

A study has identified a region of the brain that appears to play a critical role in making people more likely to gamble

The gambler's fallacy explained? Misguided belief in the big win just around the corner could be down to brain activity

Gambling addicts are likely to have developed a different pattern of brain activity than non-gamblers which gives them a misguided belief that they can always beat the odds in a game of chance, scientists have said.

Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen, who is now trying to map the brain

Microsoft’s other mogul Paul Allen is now trying to map the brain

It is a sign of Allen’s foresight that others have followed his path

Day In a Page

How I brokered a peace deal with Robert Mugabe: Roy Agyemang reveals the delicate diplomacy needed to get Zimbabwe’s President to sit down with the BBC

How I brokered a peace deal with Robert Mugabe

Roy Agyemang reveals the delicate diplomacy needed to get Zimbabwe’s President to sit down with the BBC
Video of British Muslims dancing to Pharrell Williams's hit Happy attacked as 'sinful'

British Muslims's Happy video attacked as 'sinful'

The four-minute clip by Honesty Policy has had more than 300,000 hits on YouTube
Church of England-raised Michael Williams describes the unexpected joys in learning about his family's Jewish faith

Michael Williams: Do as I do, not as I pray

Church of England-raised Williams describes the unexpected joys in learning about his family's Jewish faith
A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A visit to the Front Line by the Prime Minister's wife

A History of the First World War in 100 moments

A visit to the Front Line by the Prime Minister's wife
Comedian Jenny Collier: 'Sexism I experienced on stand-up circuit should be extinct'

Jenny Collier: 'Sexism on stand-up circuit should be extinct'

The comedian's appearance at a show on the eve of International Women's Day was cancelled because they had "too many women" on the bill
Cannes Film Festival: Ken Loach and Mike Leigh to fight it out for the Palme d'Or

Cannes Film Festival

Ken Loach and Mike Leigh to fight it out for the Palme d'Or
The concept album makes surprise top ten return with neolithic opus from Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson

The concept album makes surprise top ten return

Neolithic opus from Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson is unexpected success
Lichen is the surprise new ingredient on fine-dining menus, thanks to our love of Scandinavian and Indian cuisines

Lichen is surprise new ingredient on fine-dining menus

Emily Jupp discovers how it can give a unique, smoky flavour to our cooking
10 best baking books

10 best baking books

Planning a spot of baking this bank holiday weekend? From old favourites to new releases, here’s ten cookbooks for you
Jury still out on Manchester City boss Manuel Pellegrini

Jury still out on Pellegrini

Draw with Sunderland raises questions over Manchester City manager's ability to motivate and unify his players
Ben Stokes: 'Punching lockers isn't way forward'

Ben Stokes: 'Punching lockers isn't way forward'

The all-rounder has been hailed as future star after Ashes debut but incident in Caribbean added to doubts about discipline. Jon Culley meets a man looking to control his emotions
Mark Johnston: First £1 million jackpot spurs him on

Mark Johnston: First £1 million jackpot spurs him on

The most prize money ever at an All-Weather race day is up for grabs at Lingfield on Friday, and the record-breaking trainer tells Jon Freeman how times have changed
Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail. If you think it's awful, then just don't watch it'

Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail'

As the second series of his divisive sitcom 'Derek' hits screens, the comedian tells James Rampton why he'll never bow to the critics who habitually circle his work
Mad Men series 7, TV review: The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge

Mad Men returns for a final fling

The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge
Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground as there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit

Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground

Technology giant’s scientists say there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit