Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent and i. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; four times highly commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigations into the tobacco industry. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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The findings support the idea that increased height and cognitive ability have been positively selected for by evolution over many generations. File photo

People born to genetically-diverse parents likely to be taller and more intelligent, says study

Scientists found that height and general intelligence appear to be increasing as a result of the mixing of DNA

Robert Downey Jr in ‘Iron Man 3’. The superhero has data sent to his field of vision

New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

The researchers say it is possible to use holographic projections to provide extra information on objects in a person’s visual field in real time

Scientists studying the vocal noises made by the chestnut-crowned babbler have shown that it uses combinations of different sounds that on their own are meaningless but when combined convey a certain message to other members of the species

Chestnut-crowned babbler: Australian bird becomes first known non-human species to communicate using language

The chestnut-crowned babbler uses combinations of different sounds that, when combined, convey a certain message to other members of the species

Male academic scientists were found to be far more likely than women to get to the top of their profession

Female scientists paid £5,000 less a year than their male counterparts, report finds

At some institutions the difference can be as high as about £21,000

The number one is the oldest number we have

What exactly does ‘one’ mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

The question was central to a dispute between ConvaTec and Smith & Nephew

South Georgia pipit

Rare birds return to remote South Georgia island after successful rat eradication programme

The most southerly songbird, the South Georgia pipit, has this year nested for the first time in living memory on the mainland of South Georgia

Field trial of genetically-modified wheat failed to show it can repel aphid pests, scientists say

The government-funded trial required costly security measures because of the threat of vandalism from GM protestors

Colour reconstruction of Hallucigenia

Hallucigenia: significance of bizarre extinct creature revealed as it finally bares its teeth

The fossil's bizarre appearance had mystified scientists for more than a century

Red blood cells manufactured from stem cells have the advantage of being infection-free because they have never been inside the human body

NHS to give volunteers 'synthetic blood' made in laboratory within two years

It is hoped artificial red blood cells could be used for specialised transfusions

Researchers believe the test could diagnose pancreatic cancer before it has spread widely

Prototype test could dramatically boost chances of surviving pancreatic cancer

The form has one of cancer's highest mortality rates due to late diagnoses

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Murder of the Brink’s-MAT mastermind

'Goldfinger' of British crime's life ended in a blaze of bullets, say police
Forget little green men - aliens will look like humans, says Cambridge University evolution expert

Forget little green men

Leading evolutionary biologist says aliens will look like humans
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: An Algerian scientist adjusts to life working in a kebab shop

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

An Algerian scientist struggles to adjust to her new life working in a Scottish kebab shop
Bodyworlds museum: Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy

Dying dream of Doctor Death

Dr Gunther von Hagens has battled legal threats, Parkinson's disease, and the threat of bankruptcy
UK heatwave: Temperature reaches 39.8 degrees on Central Line - the sweatiest place in London

39.8 degrees recorded on Tube

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Computerised cooking is coming

From apps that automatically make shopping lists from your recipe books to smart ovens and robot chefs, Kevin Maney rounds up innovations to make your mouth water
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Jessie Cave's feminist cartoons

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Football Beyond Borders: Even the most distruptive pupils score at homework club

Education: Football Beyond Borders

Add football to an after-school homework club, and even the naughtiest boys can score
10 best barbecue books

Fire up the barbie: 10 best barbecue books

We've got Bibles to get you grilling and smoking like a true south American pro
Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - Junk balls and chop and slice are only way 5ft 1in Kurumi Nara can live with Petra Kvitova’s power

Nick Bollettieri's Wimbledon Files

Junk balls and chop and slice are only way 5ft 1in Kurumi Nara can live with Petra Kvitova’s power
Ron Dennis exclusive: ‘This is one of the best McLaren teams ever – we are going to do it’

‘This is one of the best McLaren teams ever – we are going to do it’

Ron Dennis shrugs off a poor start to the season in an exclusive interview, and says the glory days will come back
Seifeddine Rezgui: What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?

Making of a killer

What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?
UK Heatwave: Temperatures on the tube are going to exceed the legal limit for transporting cattle

Just when you thought your commute couldn't get any worse...

Heatwave will see temperatures on the Tube exceed legal limit for transporting cattle
Exclusive - The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Swapping Bucharest for London

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Meet the man who swapped Romania for the UK in a bid to provide for his family, only to discover that the home he left behind wasn't quite what it seemed
Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Solar power will help bring down electricity prices over the next five years, according to a new report. But it’s cheap imports of ‘dirty power’ that will lower them the most