Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web
Two adult elephants killed in close proximity in northern Kenya. Clustered kills are a sign of professional poaching

Chinese ivory trade blamed as poachers drive down elephant population by 2% a year

Elephant poaching has driven down the population across Africa by an average of two per cent per year since 2010 according to a major study into the effect of the illegal Chinese ivory trade on the world’s largest land animal.

The study found that experienced passport control officers are no better than untrained amateurs at accurately recognising faces

Passport officers no better than untrained amateurs at recognising faces, study finds

Thousands of people arriving at British airports with false passports each year could escape detection because of the difficulty of matching a photo ID to a real face, a study has found.

Dolly the first genetically copied sheep meets the press

Independence 'would damage Scotland’s edge in biomedicine'

Scotland’s reputation for scientific excellence in biomedical sciences, epitomised by the cloning of Dolly the sheep in 1996, will be significantly damaged if it votes Yes in the independence referendum on 18 September, a government minister will say on Monday.

The Cambridge scientists say Hallucigenia’s claws bear similarities to velvet worms, while the spikes are believed to be defensive

Hallucigenia revealed: The most surreal creature from strangest period in history of life on Earth

Scientists solve mystery of a creature from the Cambrian lagoons

Only as a result of the long-term monitoring of mountain glaciers did it become apparent that they were disappearing

The loss of our glaciers is a threat to millions worldwide

They are one of the most visible icons of the “cryosphere”, the cold parts of the world where temperatures fall below the freezing point of water, a natural tipping point that profoundly changes the environment.

Research has found that two thirds of the current rate of glacial melting is due to human influences on the climate

Melting glaciers are caused by man-made global warming, study shows

Scientists rule out natural causes for rapid melting

Psychologist Margaret McKinnon interviewed 15 fellow passengers who were involved in the ordeal

Scientist who took a flight that ran out of fuel conducts long-term PTSD study

A scientist who was a passenger on a transatlantic flight that ran out of fuel over the middle of the ocean has carried out a study to assess the long-term trauma of making an emergency landing at sea where everyone thought they might die.

Jo Pavey from Great Britain poses with the flag after the women's 10'000m final race

Jo Pavey gold medal: The science of her long-distance success

Just weeks away from her 41st birthday, we could have forgiven Jo Pavey, a mother of two young children, for hanging up her running shoes and switching to life in the slow lane.

Ilulissat, Greenland: Researchers from the National Science Foundation and other organizations are studying the phenomena of the melting glaciers and its long-term ramifications for the rest of the world

Global warming: Rapid rise in Arctic temperatures linked to changes in extreme weather and global wind patterns

Scientists have linked the rapid rise in Arctic temperatures over the past two decades to weather extremes in the northern hemisphere such as heatwaves in the US and flooding in Europe.

Scientists based many of their ideas for the self-folding, crawling robot on the Japanese art form origami

Self-folding 'origami' robots could be the future of space exploration or search-and-rescue

They sound like real-life transformers – the toys that can change from one shape into another – but these robots are perhaps more akin to the flat-packed world of an Ikea catalogue.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve
Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition: It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans

Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition

It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans
Besiktas vs Arsenal: Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie

Besiktas vs Arsenal

Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie
Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

As the Northern Irishman prepares for the Barclays, he finds time to appear on TV in the States, where he’s now such a global superstar that he needs no introduction
Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to Formula One

Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to F1

The 16-year-old will become the sport’s youngest-ever driver when he makes his debut for Toro Rosso next season
Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

But belated attempts to unite will be to no avail if the Sunni caliphate remains strong in Syria, says Patrick Cockburn
Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I would end up killing myself in jail'

Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I'd end up killing myself in jail'

Following last week's report on prison suicides, the former inmate asks how much progress we have made in the 50 years since the abolition of capital punishment