Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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The dress can be seen in different colours

Black and blue, or white and gold? The Independent's science editor gives the definitive verdict

One person’s “white” may actually be another person’s “light blue” when seen next to a different background or under different lighting conditions

A monstrous idea? Body transplants might no longer be science fiction

Could full body transplants really be possible within two years?

Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero believes so - and it's not quite as implausible as it sounds, says Steve Connor
Over 20 per cent of people between 50 and 60 have blood cells marked with the same DNA mutations found in leukaemia cells

DNA develops to acquire genetic mutations linked with cancer as you get older, says study

Scientists estimated that over 20 per cent of people between 50 and 60 have blood cells marked with the same DNA mutations found in leukaemia cells

Space Invaders, one of the 49 classic Atari games that the Deep Q-network has mastered

New artificial intelligence can learn how to play vintage video games from scratch

The Deep Q-network has learned to play Space Invaders and Breakout

Making PrEP available as a prophylactic could reduce the use of condoms

HIV pill: The logic of paying £500 a month so gay men don’t have to wear condoms

It could save hundreds of millions of pounds that would be spent on treating HIV infections

One in six couples experience infertility in the UK

Chief medical officer urges Lords to legalise 'three-parent' IVF

Dame Sally Davies said that tests showed the procedure would be safe

A study has shown that Dry-roasted peanuts may be more likely to trigger allergic reactions than those that are 'raw'

Children fed peanuts are less likely to develop an allergy, study claims

Lead scientist: 'Our findings suggest that the previous advice was incorrect'

The findings come from a language analysis of more than 900,000 online reviews, comparing the wording people used in giving good and bad reviews, as judged by how many stars they gave to a restaurant

Diners associate fine restaurants with sexual pleasure, say scientists

But cheap eateries are more associated with drug addiction

The CIA is worried that a foreign power may develop the ability to manipulate the global climate in way that cannot be detected, a leading climatologist has claimed

CIA: Foreign powers may develop ability to manipulate the global climate undetected

Officials are worried foreign countries may develop geoengineering - the deliberate manipulation of the global climate

A scientist looks at a section of the Cern Large Hadron Collider during maintenance works in 2013 in Meyrin

Hadron collider set for triumph ‘bigger than Higgs boson’

An upgrade will allow the particle accelerator to work at even higher energies than were used for the discovery of the Higgs boson

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003