Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent and i. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; four times highly commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigations into the tobacco industry. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web
Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a cancerous prostate cell

Nine out of ten male prostate cancer sufferers could be treated after 'game-changing' study

In what is being called the 'Rosetta Stone' of prostate research, scientists have identified the genetic mutations linked with the spread of prostate cancer

Researchers say that many glaciers in the Southern Antarctic Peninsula have become unstable since 2009, releasing vast amounts of ice into the sea, equivalent to about 56bn tonnes of meltwater each year

Glaciers in part of Antarctic thought to be stable suddenly melting at a massive rate, say scientists

Many glaciers in the Southern Antarctic Peninsula have become unstable since 2009, releasing vast amounts of ice into the sea

More than 100 primitive hammers, anvils and other stone artefacts have been unearthed in the desert hills bordering the western shores of Lake Turkana in the Kenyan Rift Valley in a discovery that the researchers claim “marks a new beginning to the known archaeological record”.

'New beginning to the known archaeological record' as oldest stone tools ever discovered found in Kenya

The implements, dating back 3.3m years, predate the earliest known members of the Homo genus by about half a million years

Soil erosion and degradation is one of the most pressing issues facing human security in the 21st century

Fertility of world's soil reaching peak that will threaten food supplies, scientists warn

More must be done to preserve the long-term viability of existing farmland, the group of leading scientists argue

A computer generated illustration of bacteria cells

Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'We’ve identified an organism that seems to represent a very distant cousin of ours and in doing so it tells us something about our own dark past'

Scientists say that the innate ability of the human brain to perceive non-random patterns in the natural world appears to go awry in gamblers

Gamblers read too much into random events which leads them to make impulsive bets they are likely to lose, says study

Seeing patterns in things when they are not actually there becomes a toxic cocktail when combined with impulsive behaviour

Planned curbs in greenhouse gas emissions won't prevent global warming 'danger limit' being reached, warns report

Study says temperatures will still rise more than 2C despite planned reductions

2014 was the warmest year on record for central England

Exceptionally warm annual temperatures have become 13 times more likely in England

Global warming to increase likelihood of 'very warm years' in England, scientists say

The rate of mass extinction will speed up for every 1C extra rise in global average temperatures

Climate change 'could make one in six species extinct by end of the century'

Plants and animals of South America, Australia and New Zealand are at risk

As a newborn, Kaiba was turning blue because his lungs weren't getting enough oxygen and his parents were told he may not make it out of the hospital

Child becomes first patient to be cured of potentially fatal illness using 3D-printed biodegradable implant

The boy was one of three babies in the US who underwent surgery involving the insertion of 3D printed splints into their throats

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine