Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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Human red blood cells have been genetically engineered to produce protein antidotes and other antibody-based medicines that can be safely delivered to any part of the body

Future soldiers could be protected against germ warfare by genetically modified blood cells

Soldiers on future battlefields could be protected against germ warfare agents by having blood transfusions with genetically modified cells that can neutralise deadly biological toxins, scientists have found.

MV ‘Cape Ray’

Decommissioning Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile at sea: Cape Ray - the boat that will take 700 tons of Assad's toxic material on its final voyage

The unprecedented programme to destroy Assad’s toxic agents – including the world’s first decommissioning ship – is explained by Steve Connor

Making and maintaining solar panels will soon be cheaper than fossil fuels

Breakthrough in solar panel manufacture promises cheap energy within a decade

Technical advance based on edible salt overcomes need to use toxic agents

Britain experienced its third warmest spring

Climate change: Global temperatures in May hit an all-time record high

Latest data exposes the myth that global warming has 'stopped'

Winning formulas: Brilliant number- crunchers should be feted

The $3m prize for maths? Welcome to the X2+y2 factor

A new multi-million dollar prize for maths aims to bring rock star status to pointy-headed academics, even though no one really understands what they do. About time, says Steve Connor
Neonics have been linked to the decline of bees

Pesticides linked to mass bee deaths also affect other friendly organisms including birds and fish

Study's findings are in stark contrast to the UK Government’s stance on neonicotinoids

Lord Winston claims private clinics are selling ineffective IVF treatment to desperate patients

Lord Winston criticises 'jungle' world of British fertility treatment

In his strongest attack yet on 'incompetent' IVF watchdog, professor claims profit is all
Once in an anxious state, the freshwater crayfish could only be calmed with tranquilisers

Anxiety research: Even crayfish get stressed, scientists show

Anxiety is not only felt by the followers of the England football team, it can also be found in the lowly crayfish, a small lobster-like creature that appears to be capable of fearing the future just like a soccer fan, a study has found.

The H1N1 1918 influenza virus. These particles have been recreated from the influenza (flu) virus strain that caused the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic

American scientists controversially recreate deadly Spanish Flu virus

The extinct influenza virus that caused the worst flu pandemic in history has been recreated from fragments of avian flu found in wild ducks in a controversial experiment to show how easy it would be for the deadly flu strain to reemerge today.

Researchers found the chemical signature within lunar rock samples brought back to earth by the Apollo missions

Echoes of ancient Earth: Further proof that the Moon was created by massive collision

The idea that the Moon was created after a massive cosmic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth some 4.5bn years ago has received its second boost in less than a week.

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Isis in Syria: A general reveals the lack of communication with the US - and his country's awkward relationship with their allies-by-default

A Syrian general speaks

A senior officer of Bashar al-Assad’s regime talks to Robert Fisk about his army’s brutal struggle with Isis, in a dirty war whose challenges include widespread atrocities
‘A bit of a shock...’ Cambridge economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

‘A bit of a shock...’ Economist with Glasgow roots becomes Zambia’s acting President

Guy Scott's predecessor, Michael Sata, died in a London hospital this week after a lengthy illness
Fall of the Berlin Wall: History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War

Fall of the Berlin Wall

History catches up with Erich Honecker - the East German leader who praised the Iron Curtain and claimed it prevented a Third World War
How to turn your mobile phone into easy money

Turn your mobile phone into easy money

There are 90 million unused mobiles in the UK, which would be worth £7bn if we cashed them in, says David Crookes
Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs:

Independent writers remember their Saturday jobs

"I have never regarded anything I have done in "the media" as a proper job"
Lyricist Richard Thomas shares his 11-step recipe for creating a hit West End musical

11-step recipe for creating a West End hit

Richard Thomas, the lyricist behind the Jerry Springer and Anna Nicole Smith operas, explains how Bob Dylan, 'Breaking Bad' and even Noam Chomsky inspired his songbook for the new musical 'Made in Dagenham'
Tonke Dragt's The Letter for the King has finally been translated into English ... 50 years on

Buried treasure: The Letter for the King

The coming-of-age tale about a boy and his mission to save a mythical kingdom has sold a million copies since it was written by an eccentric Dutchwoman in 1962. Yet until last year, no one had read it in English
Can instilling a sense of entrepreneurship in pupils have a positive effect on their learning?

The school that means business

Richard Garner heads to Lancashire, where developing the 'dragons' of the future is also helping one community academy to achieve its educational goals
10 best tablets

The world in your pocket: 10 best tablets

They’re thin, they’re light, you can use them for work on the move or keeping entertained
Lutz Pfannenstiel: The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents

Lutz Pfannenstiel interview

The goalkeeper who gave up Bayern Munich for the Crazy Gang, Bradford and a whirlwind trawl across continents
Pete Jenson: Popular Jürgen Klopp can reignite Borussia Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern Munich

Pete Jenson's a Different League

Popular Klopp can reignite Dortmund’s season with visit to Bayern
John Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

Cantlie video proves that Isis expects victory in Kobani

The use of the British hostage demonstrates once again the militants' skill and originality in conducting a propaganda war, says Patrick Cockburn
The killer instinct: The man who helps students spot potential murderers

The killer instinct

Phil Chalmers travels the US warning students how to spot possible future murderers, but can his contentious methods really stop the bloodshed?
Clothing the gap: A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd

Clothing the gap

A new exhibition celebrates women who stood apart from the fashion herd
Fall of the Berlin Wall: Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain

The Fall of the Berlin Wall

Goodbye to all that - the lost world beyond the Iron Curtain