Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent and i. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; four times highly commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigations into the tobacco industry. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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Pauline Cafferkey, the South Lanarkshire nurse who has caught
Ebola after volunteering to serve in Sierra Leone

Ebola in the UK: Pauline Cafferkey, the British nurse infected with virus, remains in a critical condition in Royal Free Hospital

Ms Cafferkey was diagnosed last Monday by doctors in Glasgow where she had arrived after flying from Sierra Leone

Nuclear power is key to protecting the environment, biologists say in their letter

Nuclear power is the greenest option, say top scientists

Environmentalists urged to ditch their historical antagonism and embrace a broad energy mix
Nick Marx leads the project at Angkor Wat

The Englishman returning wildlife to Cambodia's Angkor Wat temple complex

The 're-wilding' of the forests near the ancient site could be a model for other projects
Researchers have succeeded in converting human skin cells in a laboratory into the “primordial germ cells” normally found within the testes and ovaries; it is the first and most crucial stage in making male and female sex cells in a test tube

Skin cells can help IVF couples have children of their own

Breakthrough offers hope for those who cannot produce eggs or sperm themselves

People suffering from rheumatoid arthritis have been given new hope after some patients fitted with electrical implants reported they had become 'pain free'

Arthritis sufferers offered hope after electrical implants leave patients 'pain free'

“I have my normal life back - within six weeks I felt no pain," said one patient

Scientists have claimed that reading books on an iPad and similar e-readers in the evening may disturb sleep patterns because of the type of light the device emits

Artificial light iPad screens could be spoiling our sleep patterns

Using iPads at night might suppress the release of the hormone melatonin

Researchers suggest reveratrol could explain the 'French paradox' of a relatively high-fat diet but relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease in the wine-drinking population

Scientists discover how red wine 'miracle ingredient' resveratrol helps us stay young

It stimulates ancient cellular mechanism that slows ageing in times of stress and sickness

A code showing part of a human DNA sequence, which holds the key to targeted medicine

Genome revolution targets treatments for common cancers

Move represents a ‘paradigm shift’ in healthcare with new drugs and diagnostic techniques to be developed

The 67P/CG comet as seen from the Philae lander

Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

Other discoveries in robotics, medicine, engineering and paleontology also celebrated

Researchers have found that a brain region known as the entorhinal complex is responsible for making the key calculations of how to navigate from one place to another

After years of trying, scientists finally find our sense of direction

Our internal compass is in the brain's entorhinal complex

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War with Isis: Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria's capital

War with Isis

Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria
Scientists develop mechanical spring-loaded leg brace to improve walking

A spring in your step?

Scientists develop mechanical leg brace to help take a load off
Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock: How London shaped the director's art and obsessions

Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock

Ackroyd has devoted his literary career to chronicling the capital and its characters. He tells John Walsh why he chose the master of suspense as his latest subject
Ryan Reynolds interview: The actor is branching out with Nazi art-theft drama Woman in Gold

Ryan Reynolds branches out in Woman in Gold

For every box-office smash in Ryan Reynolds' Hollywood career, there's always been a misconceived let-down. It's time for a rethink and a reboot, the actor tells James Mottram
Why Robin Williams safeguarded himself against a morbid trend in advertising

Stars safeguard against morbid advertising

As film-makers and advertisers make increasing posthumous use of celebrities' images, some stars are finding new ways of ensuring that they rest in peace
The UK horticulture industry is facing a skills crisis - but Great Dixter aims to change all that

UK horticulture industry facing skills crisis

Great Dixter manor house in East Sussex is encouraging people to work in the industry by offering three scholarships a year to students, as well as generous placements
Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head

Hack Circus: Technology, art and learning

Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head. Rhodri Marsden meets mistress of ceremonies Leila Johnston
Sevenoaks is split over much-delayed decision on controversial grammar school annexe

Sevenoaks split over grammar school annexe

If Weald of Kent Grammar School is given the go-ahead for an annexe in leafy Sevenoaks, it will be the first selective state school to open in 50 years
10 best compact cameras

A look through the lens: 10 best compact cameras

If your smartphone won’t quite cut it, it’s time to invest in a new portable gadget
Paul Scholes column: Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now

Paul Scholes column

Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now
Why Michael Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Why Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Manchester United's talented midfielder has played international football for almost 14 years yet, frustratingly, has won only 32 caps, says Sam Wallace
Tracey Neville: The netball coach who is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

Tracey Neville is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

The former player on how she is finding time to coach both Manchester Thunder in the Superleague and England in this year's World Cup
General Election 2015: The masterminds behind the scenes

The masterminds behind the election

How do you get your party leader to embrace a message and then stick to it? By employing these people
Machine Gun America: The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons

Machine Gun America

The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons
The ethics of pet food: Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?

The ethics of pet food

Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?