Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent and i. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; four times highly commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigations into the tobacco industry. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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The analysis showed that when large donations were made by men to attractive female fundraisers, subsequent donations from men increased a further £28 on average.

Men donate more to charity when the fundraiser is an attractive women, says study

Men will give donate significantly more if they see that other men have already given large amounts and when the fundraiser is an attractive woman

An artist's illustration of an approximately Mercury-sized object slamming into the early proto-Earth. File photo

Earth's collision with a Mercury-like planet may have been vital to life flourishing, scientists say

The study raises fresh questions about how the Earth ended up in its present state

'Love hormone' oxytocin could be used to treat mental health problems

Oxytocin plays in important role in manipulating how the brain processes social information, say scientists

Epigenetic changes involve modifications in chemicals attached to the DNA molecule – rather than mutations to the DNA sequence itself

DNA changes could explain why autism runs in families, according to study

This is one of the first studies to indicate that epigenetic changes may be involved in passing autism on from parents the children

'Dark matter' not as dark as first thought: Scientists find it interacts with forces other than just gravity

Hubble telescope enables first view of the cosmic entity 'interacting with itself'

Back from the dead? The woolly mammoth

Jurassic Park in real life: The race to modify the DNA of endangered animals and resurrect extinct ones

It is without irony that some scientists are seriously raising the possibility of bringing back the mammoth from extinction to help prevent our own demise

Haddock, lemon sole and plaice could well be replaced by more southern, edible species such as hake, red mullet, gurnard, John Dory, sardines and anchovies

Haddock, plaice and other North Sea fish could disappear in next 50 years due to global warming

Forecasts predict that many cold-water species will be unable to cope with rising sea temperatures

Scientists have detected the presence of a chemical substance in the Martian soil

Water on Mars: Nasa Curiosity rover discovers brine substance in soil

There is already overwhelming evidence that rivers and lakes once existed on the Red Planet

As many as a quarter of people living in extreme poverty in developing countries are excluded from official figures on the global poor, according to a study exposing the huge data gaps in governmental statistics around the world

350 million people in extreme poverty missed off official global poor estimate, study finds

Official figures are so unreliable that experts believe the true number should be at least 350 million higher

The catastrophic rise in seawater acidity is thought to have been caused by the continual eruption of super-volcanoes, releasing vast amounts of carbon dioxide

Ocean acidification killed off more than 90 per cent of marine life 252 million years ago, scientists believe

Researchers say the oceans suddenly became more acidic, making it impossible for the vast majority of sea creatures to survive

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Giants Club: After wholesale butchery of Idi Amin's regime, Uganda’s giants flourish once again

Uganda's giants are flourishing once again

After the wholesale butchery of Idi Amin's regime, elephant populations are finally recovering
The London: After 350 years, the riddle of Britain's exploding fleet is finally solved

After 350 years, the riddle of Britain's exploding fleet is finally solved

Archaeologists will recover a crucial item from the wreck of the London which could help shed more light on what happened in the vessel's final seconds
Airbus has patented a jet that could fly from London to New York in one hour

Airbus has patented a jet that could fly from London to New York in one hour

The invention involves turbojets and ramjets - a type of jet engine - and a rocket motor
Tate Sensorium: New exhibition at Tate Britain invites art lovers to taste, smell and hear art

Tate Sensorium

New exhibition at Tate Britain invites art lovers to taste, smell and hear art
10 best sun creams for kids

10 best sun creams for kids

Protect delicate and sensitive skin with products specially formulated for little ones
Ashes 2015: Nice guy Steven Finn is making up for lost time – and quickly

Nice guy Finn is making up for lost time – and quickly

He was man-of-the-match in the third Test following his recall to the England side
Ashes 2015: Remember Ashton Agar? The No 11 that nearly toppled England

Remember Ashton Agar?

The No 11 that nearly toppled England
Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks