Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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Kapteyn's star and its planets likely come from a dwarf galaxy now merged with the Milky Way

Astronomers find oldest potentially earth-like planet

Scientists have found a potentially habitable planet in our galactic back yard. It orbits a star that can be seen with an amateur telescope and its surface may be warm enough for water to exist in liquid form.

A warmer climate is likely to result in drier summers overall, but it will also generate four or five times as many flash floods in the summer months

Britain braced for more Boscastle-style summer floods

Warmer summers will cause four or five times as many flash floods

The new method of gene therapy makes it simple and easy to edit any desired part of the DNA molecule

Breast cancer gene now linked to lung cancer among smokers

A gene linked to breast cancer has now been found to increase the chances of someone developing lung cancer, especially if they smoke, a study has found.

<p>Nucleosynthesis</p>
<p>In 1957, a paper was published which said we are all made of stardust. Well, not quite that, but almost. Four scientists of the University of Cambridge, Fred Hoyle, William Fowler and Margaret and Geoffrey Burbidge, had conducted extensive research into stellar nucleosynthesis, the theory that all elements are created in the oldest chemical factories in the universe - stars. This paper, called ‘Synthesis of the Elements in Stars’, but better known as B2FH because of the initials of its authors, was at odds with the theory common at the time that all the elements were synthesised during the Big Bang. B2FH argued that when a star ages and dies it will enrich the interstellar medium with heavier elements, from which new stars - and, presumably, we - are formed.</p>

Big Bang 'echoes' that proved Einstein correct might just have been space dust, admit scientists

Supposed gravitational waves may, in fact, have been caused by interference from the Milky Way

Richard III ’s remains show his scoliosis

A bone to pick with the Bard: Richard III was NOT a hunchback

An adolescent growth spurt that went wrong caused King Richard III’s physical deformity but it did not give him a hunchback, a limp or a withered arm as commonly portrayed in Shakespearian renditions of the last Plantagenet king, a study has found.

A person’s psychological makeup could play a role in determining their predisposition to senile dementia

Cynics may be at greater risk of developing dementia

Older people who harbour a cynical distrust of others are about three times more likely to develop dementia than individuals who have a more trusting view of humanity, a study has found.

Remains of the German airship shot down over Cuffley

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Over a Hertfordshire field, a ‘kill’ that made history as a German airship is shot down

'Zepp Sunday' was a crucial breakthrough, based on scientific ingenuity, in the struggle to make the UK’s skies safe from German airships

A tea buyer tasting the goods

Taste has nothing to do with the bumpiness of your tongue, say scientists

Thousands of concerned citizens have stuck their tongues out in the name of science and proved that being a “supertaster” has nothing to do with the number of bumps on your taste buds.

Malaria kills about 600,000 people each year, most of them young children under the age of five living in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia

High hopes for new malaria vaccine based on blood protein

A new type of malaria vaccine based on proteins found in the blood of children who develop a natural resistance to the parasitic disease has been developed by American researchers.

Smallpox was the only human viral disease to be eliminated globally by vaccination

Health experts to vote on whether to destroy the last few samples of smallpox

It was one of the biggest killers in human history and was also the only human viral disease to be eliminated globally by vaccination. Now health ministers from around the world will decide on whether to destroy the last two remaining laboratory samples of the variola virus, the cause of smallpox.

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If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
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For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
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