Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; twice commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigative journalism. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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Intensive logging makes rainforest fires more likely as the Earth warms

Fires could turn Amazon rainforest into a desert as human activity and climate change threaten ‘lungs of the world’, says study

Drying out of the rainforest threatens to ignite the tree-filled habitat – with its rich biodiversity – and convert it almost overnight into barren desert

Scientists in the US used high-speed video cameras operating at 7,500 frames a second to capture the astonishing displays

Fruit flies have evolved to avoid death with 'barrel-rolls' performed 50 times faster than we can blink

Swatting a fly has never been easy and now scientists have found out why – the insect has perfected a cunning, high-speed technique for a quick U-turn.

The report’s authors claim Britain has stockpiled anti-viral influenza drugs that effectively do not work as billed and may cause serious side effects in a significant minority of people

The drugs don't work: Britain wasted £600m of taxpayers' money on useless flu pills stockpiled by Government in case of pandemic

Pharmaceutical giants failed to disclose crucial data revealing concerns over their products Tamiflu and Relenza

A dermatologist detecting the presence of melanoma on the skin

Radical new skin cancer treatment shows promise in first clinical trials

A radical new form of cancer treatment that relies on the body’s natural “killer cells” to attack tumours has proved a success in the first clinical trials on patients suffering from advanced skin cancer, scientists have said.

Children brought up in severely deprived backgrounds are more likely to show ageing in their chromosomes compared to more privileged children, according to a new study

Telomeres: harsh childhood 'makes chromosomes age early'

One implication of study could be that chronic stress in early life could lead to shorter-than-expected lifespan for some boys

A study has identified a region of the brain that appears to play a critical role in making people more likely to gamble

The gambler's fallacy explained? Misguided belief in the big win just around the corner could be down to brain activity

Gambling addicts are likely to have developed a different pattern of brain activity than non-gamblers which gives them a misguided belief that they can always beat the odds in a game of chance, scientists have said.

Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen, who is now trying to map the brain

Microsoft’s other mogul Paul Allen is now trying to map the brain

It is a sign of Allen’s foresight that others have followed his path

An illustration of the interior of Enceladus based on data from Cassini, which suggests an ice outer shell and a low density, rocky core with a regional water ocean sandwiched in between at high southern latitudes

Evidence of liquid oceans on Saturn's moon Enceladus increases chances of finding alien life in our Solar System

One of the moons of Saturn has turned out to be another possible habitat for extraterrestrial microbes after scientists have discovered that it possesses a large ocean of water beneath its icy surface.

The study found that the sons of the men who started smoking before 11 were consistently fatter than the sons of men who started smoking later

Study: Men who started smoking as boys could be more likely to father obese sons

Men who started to smoke before the age of 11 are more likely to have overweight teenage boys compared to men started smoking later in life or who have never smoked at all, a study has found.

A top-down view of the connections between several distinct cortical areas, visualized using Allen Institute software

Mysteries of the human brain revealed as scientists release detailed 3D image of its genes and pathways

Scientists have generated the first detailed pictures of the intricate events in the womb that result in the formation of the human brain. The study could prove to be a decisive breakthrough in understanding the many cognitive disorders thought to be triggered before birth – from autism to schizophrenia.

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A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

A new Russian revolution

Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

Standing my ground

If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
The man who dared to go on holiday

The man who dared to go on holiday

New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

The Guest List 2014

Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

Jokes on Hollywood

With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

It's the best of British art... but not all is on display

Voted for by the British public, the artworks on Art Everywhere posters may be the only place where they can be seen
Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Critic claims 'I was the inspiration for Blanche DuBois'

Blanche Marvin reveals how Tennessee Williams used her name and an off-the-cuff remark to create an iconic character
Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Sometimes it's hard to be a literary novelist

Websites offering your ebooks for nothing is only the latest disrespect the modern writer is subjected to, says DJ Taylor
Edinburgh Fringe 2014: The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee

Edinburgh Fringe 2014

The comedy highlights, from Bridget Christie to Jack Dee
Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

Dame Jenny Abramsky: 'We have to rethink. If not, museums and parks will close'

The woman stepping down as chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund is worried