Steve Connor

Steve Connor is the Science Editor of The Independent and i. He has won many awards for his journalism, including five-times winner of the prestigious British science writers’ award; the David Perlman Award of the American Geophysical Union; four times highly commended as specialist journalist of the year in the UK Press Awards; UK health journalist of the year and a special merit award of the European School of Oncology for his investigations into the tobacco industry. He has a degree in zoology from the University of Oxford and has a special interest in genetics and medical science, human evolution and origins, climate change and the environment.

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Making PrEP available as a prophylactic could reduce the use of condoms

HIV pill: The logic of paying £500 a month so gay men don’t have to wear condoms

It could save hundreds of millions of pounds that would be spent on treating HIV infections

One in six couples experience infertility in the UK

Chief medical officer urges Lords to legalise 'three-parent' IVF

Dame Sally Davies said that tests showed the procedure would be safe

A study has shown that Dry-roasted peanuts may be more likely to trigger allergic reactions than those that are 'raw'

Children fed peanuts are less likely to develop an allergy, study claims

Lead scientist: 'Our findings suggest that the previous advice was incorrect'

The findings come from a language analysis of more than 900,000 online reviews, comparing the wording people used in giving good and bad reviews, as judged by how many stars they gave to a restaurant

Diners associate fine restaurants with sexual pleasure, say scientists

But cheap eateries are more associated with drug addiction

The CIA is worried that a foreign power may develop the ability to manipulate the global climate in way that cannot be detected, a leading climatologist has claimed

CIA: Foreign powers may develop ability to manipulate the global climate undetected

Officials are worried foreign countries may develop geoengineering - the deliberate manipulation of the global climate

A scientist looks at a section of the Cern Large Hadron Collider during maintenance works in 2013 in Meyrin

Hadron collider set for triumph ‘bigger than Higgs boson’

An upgrade will allow the particle accelerator to work at even higher energies than were used for the discovery of the Higgs boson

Visitors look at plastinated human bodies at 'Body - The Exhibition', in Sao Paulo, Brazil; the technology to store a high-resolution, three-dimensional copy of body organs and tissues already exists

Cadavers in the cloud would help doctors treat illness, claim scientists

A detailed 3D copy of your body could let your doctor diagnose illness or even rebuild body parts

A significant proportion of teenager are getting their first taste of nicotine from “vaping”

Fears that e-cigarettes are gateway drug as vaping outstrips puffing

36 per cent of 13- and 14-year-olds who had used e-cigarettes have never smoked a real cigarette

Digital objects like emails and pictures are becoming unreadable within a few years of being created as technology changes rapidly

Vint Cerf: The 21st century could become a digital black hole

"Unless we solve this, future centuries will wonder about us"

Plan to broadcast messages to alien worlds leaves cosmologists worrying

Astronomers consider sending radio signals to newly found habitable planets

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine