Susie Mesure

Susie Mesure writes interviews, news and features for the Independent on Sunday, Independent and i, and has done for the last ten years or so give or take two lengthy maternity leaves. She is interested in just about any topic, especially anything Scandinavian, food, or consumer-orientated, and used to be the Independent’s Retail Correspondent

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The Independent around the web
Journalist Charlotte Raven says she got it wrong

New website gets off to a shaky start: Feminist Times provokes huge row with forced sterilisation article

Editor Charlotte Raven pulls controversial piece, admitting 'we got it wrong'

How to Train you Dragon author Cressida Cowell: What’s making her breathe fire?

Anything that stops children getting excited about reading, that’s what, says the author of How To Train Your Dragon

Tender mercies: Food lovers say that halal food has a superior flavour and texture

Move over organic – the new big business in food is halal

This week's Halal Food Festival is attracting interest among a growing group of foodies beyond the Muslim community

Supporters of the initiative believe it will make pupils healthier and improve performance levels

No such thing as a free school lunch? What parents think of Nick Clegg's plans

There is some caution, but supporters of the scheme are excited about its benefits

Life after potter: Matthew Lewis at King’s Cross last week

Life after Harry Potter: Look what’s happened to Neville Longbottom – it’s magic!

The buck-toothed, pudgy, lank-haired geek is gone, transformed into a tall,  lust-worthy hunk about to take his first big (but top-secret) lead with the BBC. Susie Mesure meets Matthew Lewis

Sara Barton runs the Brewster's Brewing Company in Grantham

Return of the 'brewsters': New beer drinking 'sisterhood' helping to stimulate thriving real ale market

Women are rising through the ranks at some of Britain's biggest breweries as well as opening new ones

Thin thread: Manufacturers fear the skills of previous generations will soon be lost

Fashion designers call for return of rag trade

The 'Made in Britain' label has almost died out, along with the skills it nurtured. But a tentative revival is under way

The high street as we know is is over; according to Mr Grimsey

Special report: The high street of the future is like nothing we know

Bringing our town centres back to life requires some radical thinking, a new study will warn this week. Susie Mesure gets a preview

His job is to ‘figure out an interesting way to talk about economics’

Tim Harford: The man who gives geeks a good name

Economics has never been more accessible, or instructive, thanks to one writer's mission. Susie Mesure meets Tim Harford

The artwork was being stored in a warehouse in Red Hook, Brooklyn, one of the neighbourhoods in the eye of the Superstorm

Christie's auction house sued for 'failures' over Hurricane Sandy art damage

Insurer seeks $1.5m for 'spoilt' works that once belonged to cellist Gregor Piatigorsky and his chess champion wife Jacqueline

Day In a Page

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor