Terri Judd

Terri Judd is a reporter with The Independent, who writes regularly on defence issues, having repeatedly embedded with British troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Police officers on riot duty in Tottenham in the violent aftermath of the shooting of Mark Duggan

Mark Duggan inquest: commission investigating police shooting that sparked summer riots 'not fit for purpose'

Death in 2011 in Tottenham led to widespread rioting across London and England

Supreme Court sits in secret for first time in history

The highest court in the land controversially sat in secret for the first time in its history today but insisted it had reached the decision with "great reluctance".

Supreme Court may hear secret evidence

The highest court in the land could soon consider secret evidence for the first time after a judgment late last tonight.

Mizal Karim Al-Sweady, the father of Hamid Al-Sweady, carries a photo of his son after leaving the inquiry into his death

Al-Sweady inquiry: Iraqi father says bodies handed over by UK soldiers showed signs of torture

The father of an Iraqi teenager claimed today that his son's body showed signs of torture after it was handed back by British troops following a brutal battle.

Scotland Yard accused of being complicit in torture for failing to investigate UK’s role in alleged war crimes

Scotland Yard has been accused of being complicit in torture for failing to investigate the UK’s role in alleged war crimes.

First Al-Sweady witnesses to appear

The first Iraqi witnesses will start giving evidence before the Al-Sweady inquiry today, on the eve of the tenth anniversary of the invasion.

Stop drone attacks on Pakistan, Britain's UN counter-terrorism representative Ben Emmerson tells America

The British UN Special Rapporteur on counter-terrorism Ben Emmerson has echoed calls from Pakistan for the Americans to stop drone attacks in the country.

Marina Litvinenko: she was unsurprised by the delay - the last in a series of many - and says she still believes in the British justice system

Secrecy battle forces new delay in Alexander Litvinenko case

Procrastination, attempts to keep evidence secret and shield the identity of witnesses has led to yet another long delay before the inquiry into Alexander Litvinenko's death can start.

A delighted Danny Nightingale and his wife Sally leave the High Court

SAS sniper Danny Nightingale conviction for illegally possessing pistol and ammunition overturned

Soldier admitted illegally possessing a Glock 9mm pistol and more than 300 rounds of ammunition at a court martial

Former SAS soldier Danny Nightingale kisses his wife Sally outside the Royal Courts of Justice in London

Jailed SAS soldier Danny Nightingale set to find out whether conviction will be quashed

Nightingale admitted illegally possessing a Glock 9mm pistol and more than 300 rounds of ammunition at a court martial

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Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor