Will Dean

Will Dean is Editor of The Independent Magazine

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City slicker: Dr James Fox in front of Gustav Klimt’s ‘The Kiss’ in Vienna

Bright Lights, Brilliant Minds: a Tale of Three Cities, TV review: This whirl through Vienna's past was an artful start to a promising triple-bill

Gawd, there's a load of rubbish on at the moment isn't there? Thank goodness once more, then, for BBC4, TV's verbose uncle with ephemera to divulge and an hour in which to do it while everyone else watches The Great British Bake Off.

Thumb a ride: Mary Walker featured in ‘100-Year-Old Drivers’

100-Year-Old Drivers, TV review: This wryly amusing look at mature motorists bypasses some bigger issues

It makes a difference if you can walk to the shops or not. Design a town around people walking and you'll design a happier, healthier community. Follow the model of suburban town planning over the past 60 years and you create areas entirely dependent on being able to drive a car to go and get a pint of milk. Or need someone else to go and get you one.

Inside information: Mariella Frostrup discovered more about her great-great-grandfather's incarceration in HMP Lancaster Castle in ‘Secrets from the Clink’

Secrets from the Clink, TV review: Intriguing exposé of criminal past of celebrities' ancestors

In a more innocent age, the very notion of a celebrity being in jail was enough to trigger hysteria. Phil Spector! Pete Doherty! Paris Hilton!

10 best football gear

With just over a week to go until the start of the new season, here are the crucial pieces of kit and training aides to get you match-ready

Clowning around: Neil Maskell, Jo Hartley, Jamie Demetriou, Rebecca Gethings and Terry Mynott in ‘The Mimic’

The Mimic: TV review: This sitcom sleeper hit is still making a good impression

A slight confession. I missed the beginning of The Mimic (Channel 4) when it returned a fortnight ago. That was because it returned on the same night as Veep and Silicon Valley on Sky Atlantic, and, like the rest of the global media elite, I take my commands from Rupert Murdoch, or at least from one of his underlings.

Edward Snowden's revelations about the information lifted by the Government has cast the potential uses of Big Data in an unfortunate light, say its critics

Into A Raging Blaze by Andreas Norman; Trans. Ian Giles

The world has just heard the latest from Edward Snowden. Holed up in a Moscow hotel room, he told The Guardian his thoughts on the security services and surveillance and his bizarre new existence in Russia. His story, it goes without saying, is one to test the imagination of even the most creative writer.

Going underground: ‘The Fifteen Billion Pound Railway’

The Fifteen Billion Pound Railway, BBC2 - TV review: There's nothing boring about this look at the tunnel beneath the Thames

The London Underground can be quite a nauseating place at the best of times. If you're not shoved up against the sweaty posterior of a fellow traveller, you can be dodging the subterranean vomit of a weekend drunk. That's fairly par for the course, the cost of getting around a chaotic city. Well, the cost apart from the actual, wildly expensive, cost.

Get with the programmers: Mike Judge’s new comedy, ‘Silicon Valley’

Silicon Valley, Sky Atlantic - review: A promising start for a satire with plenty of byte

The trouble with a well-directed satire is that, often, its targets become its biggest fans.

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap By Matt Taibbi - book review: Rich pickings in a captivating tale of two Americas

In Michael Lewis's latest inevitable bestseller, Flash Boys, Lewis tells the sorry tale of Sergey Aleynikov, a talented programmer who was pretty much the only person on Wall Street to go to prison in the wake of the great crash. Aleynikov, Lewis reveals, was helped into custody by former employees Goldman Sachs for emailing himself computer code. His sentence was overturned.

Winning combination: the German team

Germany's football team: Everything you need to know about the World Cup champions

They’re going to rule football for a generation, so we’d better get to know the world champions, says Will Dean

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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape