Yasmin Alibhai Brown

Known for her sharp commentary on issues of politics, race and religion, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown won the George Orwell Prize for political journalism in 2002 and the Emma Award for Journalism in 2004. She is also a radio and television broadcaster and author of several books including the acclaimed 'The Settler's Cookbook: A Memoir of Migration', 'Love and Food' and 'Who Do We Think We Are? Imagining the New Britain'.

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Immigration enforcement officers lead a Romanian national who has been arrested on immigration offences from a house in Southall in London

Don’t blame migrants – the West helped to create their plight

When bigots tell me to go back to where I came from, I remind them I am here because the British government supported Idi Amin

Progressive thinking can come from surprising directions

‘More Human’, by one of Cameron’s most trusted friends, is, in parts, more unabashedly moral than any by Labour insiders

Nicola Sturgeon, Angus Robertson, Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and David Cameron commemorate VE Day anniversary

Liberalism? It’s been tweaked and polished and sold by the Tories

This election showed something precious may be going from our nation

Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and David Cameron appeal to the audience during the Question Time special

Not voting in the general election makes you responsible for the worst that follows

Not voting is a choice, a serious choice. Couch potatoes who can’t be bothered need to realise what that means

Tower Hamlets Mayor Lutfur Rahman leaving The High Court

Lutfur Rahman has devalued the struggle for racial justice and equality, and for that I hate him

The disgraced mayor's sins against democracy are as despicable as his transgressions against those he claims to defend

Natalie Bennett, Leanne Wood and Nicola Sturgeon embrace at the end of the debate

General Election 2015: Female audacity has made the male leaders – all of them – look cowardly

The NHS is talked about incessantly by the men, but women voters don’t seem to trust any of them

The seven leaders of Britain's main political parties take part in the general election live debate.

Our politics are more confusing than ever — but we must understand what's at stake this election

The women impressed at the leaders debate, and Nigel Farage showed his true colours

A Palestinian child runs past a water tank that was destroyed in Israeli bombing during the 50-day war between Israel and Hamas militants in the summer of 2014, in the village of Khuzaa, east of Khan Yunis, in the southern Gaza Strip

The bravery of those many Jews who fight for a fairer Israel

Hamas is a wicked and dangerous force in the Middle East. But Israel is now more wicked and dangerous

As the election approaches pledges from the political parties are coming thick and fast

With venality, vice and degeneracy rife, it's no wonder that the public has lost interest in politics

After the latest eruption of donor scandals, how can any political party say they're not influenced by the rich?

The pressures for success on our teenage daughters are driving them to self-harm

Young girls, I fear, cannot be sheltered from external forces or the storms raging in their hearts and heads

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'Timeless fashion'

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Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

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