Zoe Pilger

Zoe Pilger is an art critic for The Independent and winner of the 2011 Frieze International Writers Prize. Her first novel, Eat My Heart Out, will be published by Serpent's Tail in February 2014. She is also researching a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, on the subject of romantic love and sadomasochism in the work of contemporary female artists. She has appeared on BBC's The Review Show and Sky News

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'Unholy Union' (1819-23)'

Goya's 'Witches and Old Women Album': Pages on show together for the first time

The nightmare visions in Goya's 'Witches and Old Women Album' are brought together for the first time at the Courtauld Gallery. It is the tenderness beneath the satire that enthralls Zoe Pilger

The State. Purchased 1993

New exhibition exploring the changing state of the nation is a curtain-raiser for the election

From Greenham Common to the Troubles, the London riots to mad cow disease, the Hayward’s ambitious new show explores the changing state of the nation over the past 70 years

‘The Hermit and the Sleeping Angelica’ (1626-8) by Rubens

Rubens and His Legacy, from Van Dyck to Cézanne: Stunning works make the flesh crawl

17th Century painter is famous for his luminescent, voluptuous female nudes

Laura Eldret with works from her exhibition, 'The Juicers'

Fig.2 at the ICA Studio: 'The Juicers' is an underwhelming start to an exciting project

50 artists will hold exhibitions in 50 weeks at the London gallery

Marina Abramovic is featured in 'Risk', an exhibition on the crucial role played by risk in the creative process

Visual arts highlights of 2015: Goya, Marlene Dumas and the utopian Black Square

Your guide to the most though-provoking exhibitions coming this year

Under the skin: 'Songs of Innocence' (1789)

William Blake's printing and engraving: New show does not do his vision justice

William Blake’s influence as both visionary and revolutionary is felt to this day. For an exhibition to do justice to his frenzied imagination and political zeal is a big ask, says Zoe Pilger

A still from Duncan Campbell's hour-long film 'It for Others'

Turner Prize 2014, Tate Britain - review: Frustratingly timid

The exhibition nods to rich and potentially brilliant ideas, but steps back timid

Paul McCarthy, WS SC exhibition: The Naked Truth

His new set of paintings are shocking and frequently nauseating – but crucially they also have something to say about the dark heart of our society

From Russia with Lies: Colour photographs reveal how a new medium soon fell victim to propaganda

No images of food not available in the USSR were permitted, at the risk of tormenting the hungry populace to the point of social unrest

Virginia Woolf by Vanessa Bell c.1912
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Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003