Zoe Pilger

Zoe Pilger is an art critic for The Independent and winner of the 2011 Frieze International Writers Prize. Her first novel, Eat My Heart Out, will be published by Serpent's Tail in February 2014. She is also researching a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, on the subject of romantic love and sadomasochism in the work of contemporary female artists. She has appeared on BBC's The Review Show and Sky News

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Revolutionary: Yinka Shonibare’s ‘Girl Ballerina’

The Human Factor exhibition review: Investigating the body politic at the Hayward Gallery

A new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery exploring the development of figurative sculpture over the past 25 years shocks, repels and amuses in equal measure

Cross patch: four gods-in-a- bottle

British folk at the Tate: Art – but no class

Tate Britain's show of British folk art features objects that range from the pleasing to the mundane and the grotesque, says Zoe Pilger. But without context, it is more a collection of odds and ends than an exhibition
To be appointed an RA is very prestigious for an artist; it means entering a kind of exclusive fellowship

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition: The anarchy and ecstasy returns

Once again, the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition is an exhilaratingly eclectic mix of the astounding and the downright awful, says Zoe Pilger

Piet Mondrian (1872-1944), Farmhouse with Wash on the Line, circa 1897

Mondrian and Colour, Turner Contemporary, Margate - art review

“In a squalid yard behind the clamour of the Gare Montparnasse, a dingy staircase leads to Piet Mondrian's door,” the journalist W F A Röell wrote in 1926, when he arrived at the studio of the great Dutch artist.

Close to the bone: CT scan 3D visualisation of the mummified remains of Tayesmutengebtiu, also called Tamut, with her skeleton and amulets

Egyptian mummies: Science or sacrilege?

A blockbuster exhibition at the British Museum unwraps the mysteries of 5,000-year-old Egyptian mummies. Zoe Pilger is fascinated – but not sure they should be on show at all
Focused: photographer Andreas Gursky

Andreas Gursky: A God’s eye view of the world

Two new Andreas Gursky exhibitions capture the tension between the chilling neutrality and passionate Romanticism in his epic, enigmatic photographs – to thrilling effect

Alexandra Stewart in 'La Jetée'

Chris Marker: Mystic film-maker with a Midas touch

Chris Marker was a Nouvelle Vague film-maker whose video art is among the finest, and most affecting, ever produced. His first UK retrospective is a revelation, says Zoe Pilger

Henry Matisse: The Cut-Outs is exhibiting at the Tate Modern from 17 April to 7 September 2014

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, Tate Modern, art review

Matisse's cut-outs are ecstatic though controlled

Eye on the crawl: 'Casa Tomada' (2013) by Rafael Gómezbarros

Huge ants are the stars of the show at the Saatchi Gallery

Colombian artist Rafael Gómezbarros' horrifying insects are among the highlights of an uneven show of work from Africa and Latin America

‘The Rape of Europa’ (about 1570)

Paolo Veronese, National Gallery exhibition: the gentle man of Verona

The 16th-century Italian Renaissance artist Paolo Veronese displayed tenderness and humanity in his powerful  portraits of rape and death, discovers Zoe Pilger at a wonderful new exhibition

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