Zoe Pilger

Zoe Pilger is an art critic for The Independent and winner of the 2011 Frieze International Writers Prize. Her first novel, Eat My Heart Out, will be published by Serpent's Tail in February 2014. She is also researching a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, on the subject of romantic love and sadomasochism in the work of contemporary female artists. She has appeared on BBC's The Review Show and Sky News

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Installation (Blue Pavilion) by Pezo von Ellrichshausen at the Royal Academy of Arts
Alex Van Gelder, Meat Portrait #026, 2012

Alex Van Gelder, Meat Portraits- art review: 'The overwhelming feeling is one of nausea'

Georgia O’Keefe meets the body-preserving anatomist Gunther Von Hagens

Concrete bungle: Exhibition of history of Milton Keynes fails to capture flawed urban experiment

Milton Keynes deserves more than a PR version of its futuristic roots

Miss Pokeno's 'Cake Bed'

Miss Pokeno and The Sisters of Perpetual Resistance: Review - 'militant feminist art'

HQ, London: While female artists a few years ago cynically used feminist imagery but rejected the label, this exhibition is committed

Bruce Munro's 'River of Light' is 'dazzling but not necessarily in a good way'

Arts review: Bruce Munro, Winter Light At Waddesdon

Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire

Bob Dylan's gates are welded out of vintage iron and metal parts

Bob Dylan Mood Swings exhibition: review - Iron gates 'are inoffensive and need some bite'

Bob Dylan's new iron sculpture exhibition is lacking dynamism, but the musician proves himself to be a talented polymath rather than a hobbyist

The bigger picture: Tate Britain’s director Penelope Curtis

Penelope Curtis: Matriarch of the museum

Tate Britain's first female director Penelope Curtis is ready to realise her artistic vision when the gallery reopens next week, after a multi-million pound refurbishment. It's the next stage of her lifelong obsession with the arts, she tells Zoe Pilger

James Balmforth's

Art review: Open Heart Surgery, The Moving Museum, London

The title of this exhibition refers not to a theme of blood-thirsty conceptualism, but the intimate, delicate nature of the artworks included. Art is indeed a painful process, involving much inner probing.

'Untitled, 2010' by Louse Bourgeois, an artwork in her exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Art review: Louise Bourgeois - A Woman Without Secrets

French-born New Yorker Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010) is perhaps the greatest female artist of the 20th century. She is also one of the greatest artists full-stop, but her work is powerful because it expresses the hunger and ferociousness of a particularly female kind of experience.

Day In a Page

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

Meet Japan's AKB48

Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
In pictures: Breathtaking results of this weekend's 'supermoon'

Weekend's 'supermoon' in pictures

The moon appeared bigger and brighter at the weekend
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor