Zoe Pilger

Zoe Pilger is an art critic for The Independent and winner of the 2011 Frieze International Writers Prize. Her first novel, Eat My Heart Out, will be published by Serpent's Tail in February 2014. She is also researching a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, on the subject of romantic love and sadomasochism in the work of contemporary female artists. She has appeared on BBC's The Review Show and Sky News

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Bruce Munro's 'River of Light' is 'dazzling but not necessarily in a good way'

Arts review: Bruce Munro, Winter Light At Waddesdon

Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire

Bob Dylan's gates are welded out of vintage iron and metal parts

Bob Dylan Mood Swings exhibition: review - Iron gates 'are inoffensive and need some bite'

Bob Dylan's new iron sculpture exhibition is lacking dynamism, but the musician proves himself to be a talented polymath rather than a hobbyist

The bigger picture: Tate Britain’s director Penelope Curtis

Penelope Curtis: Matriarch of the museum

Tate Britain's first female director Penelope Curtis is ready to realise her artistic vision when the gallery reopens next week, after a multi-million pound refurbishment. It's the next stage of her lifelong obsession with the arts, she tells Zoe Pilger

James Balmforth's

Art review: Open Heart Surgery, The Moving Museum, London

The title of this exhibition refers not to a theme of blood-thirsty conceptualism, but the intimate, delicate nature of the artworks included. Art is indeed a painful process, involving much inner probing.

'Untitled, 2010' by Louse Bourgeois, an artwork in her exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Art review: Louise Bourgeois - A Woman Without Secrets

French-born New Yorker Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010) is perhaps the greatest female artist of the 20th century. She is also one of the greatest artists full-stop, but her work is powerful because it expresses the hunger and ferociousness of a particularly female kind of experience.

A woman looks at Cupola by Victor Sydorenko at the preview of the new Contemporary Ukrainian Artists exhibition

Art review: Contemporary Ukrainian Artists, Saatchi Gallery, London

What does Ukrainian art bring to mind? Walking around this exhibition of miscellaneous contemporary artists, two themes are noticeable: first, the image of people watching disaster unfold, impassive. Second, the image of muscular bodies falling gracefully through space.

Learning the ropes: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s ‘Bound Over to Keep the Faith’

Has the Turner Prize grown up?

There's no faeces, and remarkably little attention-seeking. Instead of the shock effects of years gone by, the 2013 exhibition that opened yesterday offers accomplished and thoughtful art, says Zoe Pilger

Frieze Art Fair

Frieze Art Fair 2013: A frenetic feast of creative expression

This year's Frieze Art Fair and Masters are bigger than ever – a sign of London's growing importance as an international art centre, says Zoe Pilger

James Cauty, The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Parts I and II

Art review: James Cauty, The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Parts I and II

When you walk into this gallery under the arches of Hoxton Station, you are confronted by a spectacle in the best sense. The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Part I (2013) is a large installation of a post-apocalyptic Britain in which all the familiar signs of civilization have been ravaged.

False Positives and False Negatives

How two sisters turned a murder into a work of art

Twin artists Jane and Louise Wilson tell Zoe Pilger why they stayed at the scene of a crime for their new show

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine