Zoe Pilger

Zoe Pilger is an art critic for The Independent and winner of the 2011 Frieze International Writers Prize. Her first novel, Eat My Heart Out, will be published by Serpent's Tail in February 2014. She is also researching a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, on the subject of romantic love and sadomasochism in the work of contemporary female artists. She has appeared on BBC's The Review Show and Sky News

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'Untitled, 2010' by Louse Bourgeois, an artwork in her exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Art review: Louise Bourgeois - A Woman Without Secrets

French-born New Yorker Louise Bourgeois (1911-2010) is perhaps the greatest female artist of the 20th century. She is also one of the greatest artists full-stop, but her work is powerful because it expresses the hunger and ferociousness of a particularly female kind of experience.

A woman looks at Cupola by Victor Sydorenko at the preview of the new Contemporary Ukrainian Artists exhibition

Art review: Contemporary Ukrainian Artists, Saatchi Gallery, London

What does Ukrainian art bring to mind? Walking around this exhibition of miscellaneous contemporary artists, two themes are noticeable: first, the image of people watching disaster unfold, impassive. Second, the image of muscular bodies falling gracefully through space.

Learning the ropes: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s ‘Bound Over to Keep the Faith’

Has the Turner Prize grown up?

There's no faeces, and remarkably little attention-seeking. Instead of the shock effects of years gone by, the 2013 exhibition that opened yesterday offers accomplished and thoughtful art, says Zoe Pilger

Frieze Art Fair

Frieze Art Fair 2013: A frenetic feast of creative expression

This year's Frieze Art Fair and Masters are bigger than ever – a sign of London's growing importance as an international art centre, says Zoe Pilger

James Cauty, The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Parts I and II

Art review: James Cauty, The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Parts I and II

When you walk into this gallery under the arches of Hoxton Station, you are confronted by a spectacle in the best sense. The Aftermath Dislocation Principle Part I (2013) is a large installation of a post-apocalyptic Britain in which all the familiar signs of civilization have been ravaged.

False Positives and False Negatives

How two sisters turned a murder into a work of art

Twin artists Jane and Louise Wilson tell Zoe Pilger why they stayed at the scene of a crime for their new show

Art review: Yayoi Kusama, White Infinity Nets

What is obsession? Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, now 84, has been making the Infinity Net series for more than half a century – delicate white nets painted onto large canvases. They appear to be both a symptom of the mental illness that has dogged her since childhood, and a sign of her continuing power to overcome it through art.

Artwork 'Au Naturel' by British artist Sarah Lucas

Art review: Sarah Lucas, Situation - There are boobs and bum aplenty, but there is also a point

Zoe Pilger reviews feminist artist Sarah Lucas's first major solo exhibition

Alison Jackson: A world populated by lookalikes

The photographer tells Zoe Pilger how she shoots those disconcerting pictures

The Queen 'cuts' Prince George's umbilical cord in an Alison Jackson lookalike photograph.

Alison Jackson reveals the tricks behind her lookalike celebrity portraits

The photographer shines a light behind the head of her Prince William lookalike to make him appear bald

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