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The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. In football, what is the action of kicking a ball through an opponent's legs called?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which is Africa's only country with Spanish as an official language?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Joey Bishop was a member of which group of entertainers often associated with Las Vegas?

9. Which now-rare disease of humans and animals, characterised by black skin lesions, takes its name from the Greek word for coal?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. 'Keep Fighting' was a sign on the wall of which football team's dressing room in the 1960s?

The Saturday Quiz: answers

This week's answers

Teapickers

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What card game is said to have gained its name from the Galata Bridge which spans the Golden Horn and links the old and new parts of European Istanbul?

The Saturday Quiz answers

This week's answers

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Which scientific phrase was first uttered by the astronomer Fred Hoyle on BBC radio in 1949?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The Rev CL Jackson was also known as 'The Million Dollar Voice'. Who was his soul singer daughter?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What links the last king of Albania with the home of puppets Zig & Zag?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The 24 Seven Guide: Let's hear it for Reg Varney's barmy army

The truth is out there, in Walsall and Stanford-Le-Hope, for followers of Noggin the Nog and David Duchovny. Be it Gerry, Gillian or Pamela, somewhere there's an Anderson Appreciation Society for you. Anthony Clavane enters the obsessive domain of cult TV land

Television & Radio: The fame game

Fame is a drug, an agent of destruction. A Channel 4 season on this 20th-century addiction takes an anti-Hello! approach to celebrity. James Rampton gets a fix

Television & Radio: The fame game

Fame is a drug, an agent of destruction. A Channel 4 season on this 20th-century addiction takes an anti-Hello! approach to celebrity. James Rampton gets a fix

The 24 Seven Guide: Let's hear it for Reg Varney's barmy army

The truth is out there, in Walsall and Stanford-Le-Hope, for followers of Noggin the Nog and David Duchovny. Be it Gerry, Gillian or Pamela, somewhere there's an Anderson Appreciation Society for you. Anthony Clavane enters the obsessive domain of cult TV land

Television & Radio: On the Box

Telly has gone awards crazy. Next Wednesday sees the second National Television Awards on ITV. Hosted by Trevor McDonald and broadcast from the Royal Albert Hall, this would-be rival to the Baftas features such intriguing nominations as Ross Kemp, right, (that's Grant Mitchell from EastEnders to you and me) for Best Actor, Des O'Connor Tonight for Best Talk Show and The Big Breakfast for Best Factual Entertainment. Then next month the BBC is transmitting its TV60 Awards to mark its 60th year of existence, and in December it's time for the British Comedy Awards again. But perhaps the most unusual awards ceremony of all is on the Disney Channel tomorrow week. On that day, the ubiquitous awards host Jonathan Ross will be presenting the 1996 Teacher of the Year Awards. An overall winner will be selected from 12 Regional Teachers of the Year. What next? The Award Ceremony of the Year Award?

Gut Barging: Britain's bargers extend a friendly paunch to Japan

The gut-barging year reached a thrilling climax at its world championships in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, last weekend when Mad Maurice, "the Belgian from Melksham" retained the title he has held for the past four years.

Angela Lewis on pop

How bizarre a concept The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion (below) looked at their birth back in 1990. What had made Spencer, formerly leader of New York's notorious punk wastrels, Pussy Galore, want to don a silver shirt and form a blues band? Quite a shift that, but one that has provided four albums of flamboyantly uncivilised, raw and funky albums to date. Pussy Galore's high sleaze factor lives on, but in place of trashy white noise there's punky black blues-manship. All fun and good stuff for Spencer's studenty alternative fan base who wouldn't know the blues if they sat on a Howlin' Wolf vinyl LP and broke it. For blues virgins, Spencer is pretty freaky and clever to boot.

Site Unseen: `Diver Bill', Winchester Cathedral

The great Anglican cathedrals seem so permanent and enduring a part of our landscape that it is hard to imagine a Britain without them. Durham, Canterbury, Wells, Salisbury and many others will surely be here for eternity and a day.

Decca Aitkenhead on clubs

Legends is one of those clubs which have been been running successfully for so long now that there's a danger of assuming you know all there is to know about it. Tucked in the heart of Mayfair, it already, rightly, enjoys a reputation as a sophisticated venue for a slightly older crowd - but the past few months have seen some major developments.

4-10 October day planner

Today

Ryan Gilbey on film

The film festival season is upon us. Cambridge and Edinburgh have both been terrific successes. (Quick update on the latter: 31,000 people attended this year; were they all at Pulp's "Scene By Scene" event? No, it just felt that way.) And before London gets what it deserves in November, it's time for one of the smaller but more interesting digressions from normal programming. The Latin American Film Festival (which began last week and runs until next Thursday) has grown this year, and attracted some prestigious work. You may already have heard of Lone Star, the second film by underdog auteur John Sayles to be released this year (after the more disappointing The Secret of Roan Inish). It's the story of a revelatory murder investigation near the Rio Grande, and features brilliant performances by Frances McDormand and the underused Kris Kristofferson.

David Benedict on theatre

"Good Lord... the man's from Taiwan!" In a collective burst of xenophobia, vast swathes of the British press gasped at the ability of Ang Lee to penetrate the heart of "dear Jane" in his film of Sense and Sensibility.

Angela Lewis on pop

Scud Mountain Boys' music flows with the sort of laid-back, country rock gentleness that lulled America into MOR wonderland in the early 1970s. Which makes it strange that they should be on scruff rock label Sub Pop, or such current faves among indie types usually satisfied by noisier Yank arrivals. Probably it's because Scud Mountain Boys' lyrics are fascinatingly intense, owing more to The Carter Family than Crosby, Stills & Nash. On their album Massachusetts, softly sung lyrics of personal destruction are etched into every song, as if giving stories to the world helps the wounds heal better. "At the time we started the band, I had just come out of a bad relationship that blew up in an ugly fashion," recalls bassist Bruce. "We in the band were all going through a similar thing, and we thought it would be a fun thing to do, sit around and play heartbreak songs. We were definitely indirectly influenced by the Carter Family, old traditional music which had this really bleak and sad streak to it."

Today's ticket offer

Jo Brand Comedy Benefit

Liese Spencer on events

Ever wondered what it'd be like to be a super furry animal? Well, here's your chance to become a nuclear-charged guinea pig for the evening, as the Albany Theatre is transformed into a capsule of experimental theatre and space-age music. The concept for tomorrow's event came from the original biosphere 2, a nuclear protection pod in the Arizona Desert which, following a stringent selection process, became home to seven American government guinea pigs. Sealed up for two years in this supposedly perfect world, the secret seven went slowly bonkers, contaminating their controlled environment with messy affairs and sneaking out for illicit hamburgers when the FBI wasn't looking.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

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Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

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This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

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Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

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The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

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Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee