Property search
On Google+
The Independent
 
The Independent on Google+
i100
i100 on Google+
i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. Which musical format was launched by Sony in 1992 and remained on sale until 2013?

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. David Ogilvy

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. In 1962, who did 'Time' magazine call "The most sought-after wizard in today's advertising industry"?

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. Harper Lee (for To Kill a Mocking Bird)

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. Who won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize for fiction with their only published novel?

Growing up on screen: Child star Shirley Temple

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brainteaser

1. Since giving birth in 2009, Californian Nadya Suleman has been known by which sobriquet?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz:

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. The Mikado

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The Lord High Executioner of Titipu appears in which comic opera?

The Saturday Quiz answers

1. Spike Jonze (in The Wolf of Wall Street)

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which director, whose film is nominated for Best Picture at this year's Oscars, also has a small part in another Best Picture nominee?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The International, a supermarket on London's King's Road – now a Co-op – was the inspiration for a 1979 song by which band?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. In a 1900 cricket match at Crystal Palace, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle took the wicket of whom? An event he commemorated in verse in "A Reminiscence of Cricket".

More than child's play

Suzanna Drew-Edwards takes the rollercoaster trip of a lifetime, and guides us through the best children's activities this summer

pick of the week

STAR TREKKING

Jake Slack on clubs

Any large club worth its salt these days has a movie room, although it usually consists of little more than a dodgy video projector and the organiser's bedsheet hanging from the ceiling. And if there's any soundtrack at all, you can never hear it over the bleed from the techno being pumped out next door. But at Blue Fluid, a new monthly slot at the Forum - described as a "soiree" rather than just another club - they're putting the complimentary movie (tonight, it's Priscilla Queen of the Desert) at the top of the bill, with good sound and cinemascope guaranteed.

James Rampton on comedy

Jimeoin (below), an Irish comedian based in Australia, got his big break on a Down Under daytime TV programme called The Midday Show. "It's just like Pebble Mill," he reveals. "I really enjoy daytime TV. Nightime TV can be a bit too hip for its own good. Daytime TV is like doing comedy in a supermarket, nobody really notices you're there. When you get to the punchline, the audience just knit quicker." He soon graduated to hosting Tonight Live - "a direct rip-off of Late Night with Letterman" - and has since become the biggest thing in Australia this side of Merv Hughes's moustache.

Angela Lewis on pop

Black British soul music might be microscopic in influence compared with its monolithic American counterpart, but when it works in mysterious ways, it's satisfying stuff. Gabrielle (below right) and Mark Morrison illustrate the point. Both took up residency in the Top 10 earlier this year. Gabrielle's "Give Me a Little More Time" was a south London Motown oddity, while Morrison played strictly by the slick, US R&B rules, and was blander for it. Gabrielle didn't have a Number one, but had the raw earnesty to hit where it hurts. And so, too, does her eponymous album. Her songs of emotional wear and tear, plus gritty insight in "Forget About the World", come from someone who takes from inside rather than production- line soul techniques.

David Benedict on theatre

"Three handkerchief weepie" is a phrase usually associated with a Bette Davis movie of more than usual excess. But it also covers audiences crying with laughter at performances by Maggie Fox and Sue Ryding, better known as Lip Service. How, then, to explain this deranged cross between a demented bumble bee and an outraged lacrosse stick?

Iain Gale on exhibitions

Even in the current climate of renewed enthusiasm for Victorian painting, spearheaded by Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber's seemingly tireless bidding at auction on the pre-Raphaelites and late Romantics, certain themes and artists of the golden age of narrative painting continue to remain out of fashion or relatively unknown. One such example is Harold Swanwick, currently re-investigated at the Towner Art Gallery in Eastbourne.

For better, for worse

If you're having doubts about tying the knot, then Brian Hill's documentary, The State of Marriage, could confirm your worst fears. James Rampton reports

on the box

Having peeked behind the doors of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in True Brits, the BBC is now training its cameras on the Ministry of Defence. Broadcast in five parts on BBC1 from 8 August, Defence of the Realm explores some of the country's most secretive organisations. Series producer Richard Bradley has filmed the nuclear bunker below Whitehall and the firing-room of a Trident submarine. Nicholas Soames MP, Minister of State for the Armed Forces and apologist for Prince Charles on the night of Diana's Panorama interview, gives another typically robust performance. "We are blessed by our armed forces," he says. "If British industry was run by the armed services, we'd be bloody Japan!"

site unseen The Customs House, King's Lynn

Arguments over the European Union, a single currency and tabloid xenophobia can obscure the fact that, for centuries, we have happily traded with the towns and cities of what is now Germany. Imports, exports - we both benefited.

site unseen The first Lord's Cricket Ground, Dorset Square, London

The smell of cut grass and the sudden appearance in newspapers of long lists of cricket scores - baffling to the uninitiated - herald the arrival of summer.

pick of the week: GREYHOUND DERBY

The country was going to the dogs long before Blur's Damon Albarn revealed his penchant for greyhounds, and today, callow, mockney pretenders can rub shoulders with old-school sheepskinned enthusiasts for one of the high spots of the canine calendar (above). For the best views, head for the Stadium Grandstand. But if you fancy reclining in comfort, repair to the Diamond Room for a pint and a flutter. Races last around 28 seconds, as the Kate Mosses of the dog world break from their traps and dash after those rabbit rags in a bid for doggy glory.

DAY PLANNER

Today

David Benedict on theatre

How to be a literary manager: Go to the movies. Theatres don't programme plays any more, they just put on stage versions of classic films. Find a masterpiece and massacre it appears to be the idea. Tommy Steele did it twice. Not content with tampering with the sublime Singin' in the Rain, he then insisted on touring Some Like It Hot (and nearly bankrupted his producers into the bargain) while Simon Callow came a cropper with Les Enfants du Paradis. That debacle was a molehill when compared with the towering horrors of Carrie the musical which lost its leading lady, Barbara Cook, when she walked out after having nearly been decapitated by the set.
Latest stories from i100
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 30 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee