Property search
On Google+
The Independent
 
The Independent on Google+
i100
i100 on Google+
i Newspaper
 
TheIPaper
The Independent around the web

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The failed Lionel Bart musical "Twang!!" was based on the exploits of which fictional character?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Sir Chris Hoy won six Olympic golds - in which four events?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Harry Nilsson's flat in Curzon Street, Mayfair, saw two pop stars' deaths, one in 1974, the other in 1978. Whose?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

What was this name of this film, starring Leonardo di Caprio as confidence trickster Frank Abagnale Jr?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which was the second country in the world, after Great Britain, to issue postage stamps valid within the entire country?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What links Jarvis Cocker and Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood and Phil Selway?

Hollie Cook's father was a member of which band?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. "Crying, talking, sleeping, walking". What comes next?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

What connects Dizzee Rascal (pictured), Russell Brand and Caitlin Moran?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What was recently named the UK's most downloaded song?

The Saturday Quiz answers

 

American aviator Douglas Corrigan was nicknamed 'Wrong Way' after he allegedly flew across where by mistake in 1938?

The Saturday Quiz answers

 

Olivia Gwyn-Jones on clubs

In honour of the Euro 96 invasion, Soccercity Shine opens on Friday night at the Hacienda, Manchester. The Hacienda is the grand dame of northern house clubs, leading the dance scene from its Fac 51 springboard. Shine has been running for more than four years, but it is decked out in smart new international kit, with guest DJs in keeping with the European sporting theme.

Angela Lewis on pop

The most dynamic offering on techno dub outfit Zion Train's fifth album Grow Together is "Babylon's Burning (repetitive beats mix)". Yes, it's the old Ruts punk classic, but with the 1970s guitars stripped away and a juggernaut of hard, frenetic beats in their place. The fiery spirit and "Babylon's Burning" rant remains, but in a mid-1990s context. The other telling thing about Zion Train is their magazine called The Wobbler (Universal Egg & the Wibbly Wobbly World of Music). No, stop sniggering - included among the 22 protest groups' addresses which are mentioned on the back page are Reclaim the Streets, Cannabis Hemp Information Club, Hunt Sabs Association and Road Alert. They are not simply a band - they are a way of life.

Film of the week: The Confessional

Robert Lepage's convoluted thriller is rich, dark and wry, its brooding tone neatly tempered by a ticklish sense of humour. It's set in Quebec City in 1952, where Hitchcock is shooting I Confess, and on the sidelines, a pregnant 16-year-old is opening her heart to a priest; and in 1989, too, when the girl's son tries to trace his father and discovers a trail of red herrings that would have foxed Hitchcock. It doesn't add up to much, but it's fun doing the sums.

James Rampton on comedy

Liverpool is traditionally seen as a hotbed of humour - an impression reinforced by the Euro Comedy 96 Festival currently taking place in the city. But local comedian Terry Titter (below), who is hosting shows during the Festival, and who recently won an award from the Liverpool Echo as Comedian of the Year, dismisses the popular image of his home town as a "tired myth". "It seems that because of the Liver Birds, Bread, Jimmy Tarbuck and Cilla Black, people think everyone in Liverpool is a comedian. But I don't think people here are any funnier than in Newcastle, Edinburgh or Leeds. I find it a hindrance. I get a groan from people when they hear I'm from Liverpool. They think, 'Oh no, not another cheeky, chirpy Scouser'. You've got a lot of baggage to get past."

numeracy

It's the 7th of June, so here are some sevens to ponder:

Chess

Before getting embroiled in the games of the Karpov-Kamsky match (their past games have averaged around 70 moves each, incidentally), here's a nice short problem. Composed by Hans Rehm, it's White to play and mate in 11.

week in week out

Today Dorothy Parker of the New Yorker, who at the death of slow- moving President Coolidge had asked, "How could they tell?" herself definitely died in 1967.

Keep taking the tablets

Since Emergency Ward 10 threw open its doors 40 years ago, hospital dramas have continued to set the nation's pulse racing. James Rampton examines the extent of our addiction

on the box

Barely has the nation had time to catch its breath after Andrew Graham-Dixon's excellent and exhaustive A History of British Art before the BBC launches another blockbusting art history series. Rather than a cool-dude broadsheet critic in a suit, however, Sister Wendy's Story of Painting offers us a bespectacled nun in a habit. The making of the 10-part series, a comprehensive "de-mystification" of art due to be broadcast on BBC1 from Sunday 30 June, must have taken it out of the 66-year-old. It took more than 100 days, travelling 30,000 miles, and visiting more than 40 art galleries, churches and studios in 12 countries. Sister Wendy Beckett has obviously not taken a vow of inactivity.

Day planner

Today

literacy

Which is the odd one out:

Week in week out

Today In 1669 Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary; unlike most of us, who give up on 5 January, he had kept it for over nine years. The first TV panel game was Spelling Bee, a six-a-side quiz presented by Freddie Grisewood in 1938; later came Tactile Bee, Tasting Bee and Musical Bee.

Site unseen: Sir Sidney Waterlow, Highgate, London

The recent and continuing fiasco over Railtrack's inability to produce accurate railway timetables must have had one man at least spinning in his grave. Sir Sidney Waterlow made his fortune by printing tickets and timetables for Victorian travellers.

Pick of the week

CLAES OLDENBURG

Ring leader

At Thaxted's Morris Ring Meeting, more than 180 dancers from 20 clubs perform some of the male ceremonial dances of England. The only Ring meeting to be held in the same place every year, the men are bussed out to sites in various East Anglian villages and end up with a "mass dance" in Thaxted.
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there