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The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which 1922 film, directed by FW Murnau, had its premiere at the Berlin Zoological Garden?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answer's to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. The traditional Danish song "Skuld gammel venskab rejn forgo", translated in 1927 by Jeppe Aakjær is a translation of which 1788 Scottish composition?

Let’s get quizzical: What really makes a quiz fizz?

‘Tis the season to answer questions, recall fascinating facts and show off your general knowledge

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. What is the largest city through which central Europe’s River Isar flows?

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Which is the  closest capital city to Beijing?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkel Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs is the full name of which literary and cinematic character?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Lake Vostok is the largest lake on which continent?

The Saturday Quiz answers

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

The Saturday Quiz: Try our weekly brain teaser

1. Thomas Terry Hoar Stevens, born in Finchley in 1911, is best known by which stage name?

John Lyttle on film

Sometimes a movie is all incidentals. Sometimes it has to be. From Dusk to Dawn (below right), for instance, bills itself as a vampire flick, but has absolutely nothing to add to cinema's vampire lore, while its plot - or plots - are shamelessly borrowed from Cape Fear and The Evil Dead, the latter stitched to the former in a manner Baron Frankenstein might consider crude.

David Benedict on theatre

The whole of Broadway knew that Zoe Caldwell's powerhouse performance as Maria Callas in Masterclass was a dead cert for best actress at this year's Tony Awards. British producers have been winging their way across the Atlantic to put their bids in for the London production. British names suggested for the role include Frances de la Tour, Maggie Smith and Diana Rigg.

Olivia Gwyn-Jones on clubs

In honour of the Euro 96 invasion, Soccercity Shine opens on Friday night at the Hacienda, Manchester. The Hacienda is the grand dame of northern house clubs, leading the dance scene from its Fac 51 springboard. Shine has been running for more than four years, but it is decked out in smart new international kit, with guest DJs in keeping with the European sporting theme.

Angela Lewis on pop

The most dynamic offering on techno dub outfit Zion Train's fifth album Grow Together is "Babylon's Burning (repetitive beats mix)". Yes, it's the old Ruts punk classic, but with the 1970s guitars stripped away and a juggernaut of hard, frenetic beats in their place. The fiery spirit and "Babylon's Burning" rant remains, but in a mid-1990s context. The other telling thing about Zion Train is their magazine called The Wobbler (Universal Egg & the Wibbly Wobbly World of Music). No, stop sniggering - included among the 22 protest groups' addresses which are mentioned on the back page are Reclaim the Streets, Cannabis Hemp Information Club, Hunt Sabs Association and Road Alert. They are not simply a band - they are a way of life.

Film of the week: The Confessional

Robert Lepage's convoluted thriller is rich, dark and wry, its brooding tone neatly tempered by a ticklish sense of humour. It's set in Quebec City in 1952, where Hitchcock is shooting I Confess, and on the sidelines, a pregnant 16-year-old is opening her heart to a priest; and in 1989, too, when the girl's son tries to trace his father and discovers a trail of red herrings that would have foxed Hitchcock. It doesn't add up to much, but it's fun doing the sums.

James Rampton on comedy

Liverpool is traditionally seen as a hotbed of humour - an impression reinforced by the Euro Comedy 96 Festival currently taking place in the city. But local comedian Terry Titter (below), who is hosting shows during the Festival, and who recently won an award from the Liverpool Echo as Comedian of the Year, dismisses the popular image of his home town as a "tired myth". "It seems that because of the Liver Birds, Bread, Jimmy Tarbuck and Cilla Black, people think everyone in Liverpool is a comedian. But I don't think people here are any funnier than in Newcastle, Edinburgh or Leeds. I find it a hindrance. I get a groan from people when they hear I'm from Liverpool. They think, 'Oh no, not another cheeky, chirpy Scouser'. You've got a lot of baggage to get past."

numeracy

It's the 7th of June, so here are some sevens to ponder:

Chess

Before getting embroiled in the games of the Karpov-Kamsky match (their past games have averaged around 70 moves each, incidentally), here's a nice short problem. Composed by Hans Rehm, it's White to play and mate in 11.

week in week out

Today Dorothy Parker of the New Yorker, who at the death of slow- moving President Coolidge had asked, "How could they tell?" herself definitely died in 1967.

Keep taking the tablets

Since Emergency Ward 10 threw open its doors 40 years ago, hospital dramas have continued to set the nation's pulse racing. James Rampton examines the extent of our addiction

on the box

Barely has the nation had time to catch its breath after Andrew Graham-Dixon's excellent and exhaustive A History of British Art before the BBC launches another blockbusting art history series. Rather than a cool-dude broadsheet critic in a suit, however, Sister Wendy's Story of Painting offers us a bespectacled nun in a habit. The making of the 10-part series, a comprehensive "de-mystification" of art due to be broadcast on BBC1 from Sunday 30 June, must have taken it out of the 66-year-old. It took more than 100 days, travelling 30,000 miles, and visiting more than 40 art galleries, churches and studios in 12 countries. Sister Wendy Beckett has obviously not taken a vow of inactivity.

Hot tickets

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Chess

Garry Kasparov's place at the top of the world rankings, a position he has held for the past 12 years, must be under threat after his defeat by Vladimir Kramnik in the sixth round of the Dos Hermanas tournament in Seville. Kramnik is currently ranked equal with Kasparov, but the manner of his victory suggests that he may be poised to overtake.

Week in week out

Today In 1669 Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary; unlike most of us, who give up on 5 January, he had kept it for over nine years. The first TV panel game was Spelling Bee, a six-a-side quiz presented by Freddie Grisewood in 1938; later came Tactile Bee, Tasting Bee and Musical Bee.

Site unseen: Sir Sidney Waterlow, Highgate, London

The recent and continuing fiasco over Railtrack's inability to produce accurate railway timetables must have had one man at least spinning in his grave. Sir Sidney Waterlow made his fortune by printing tickets and timetables for Victorian travellers.
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