15 best Christmas bouquets

Stray slightly from tradition with your decorations this year and opt for a flowery festive spray

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The Independent Online

Flowers are usually associated with spring and summer, but we think there’s no better time to treat someone – or even yourself – to a bouquet than Christmas time, when a beautiful festive spray will look a picture nestled among other yuletide decorations. 

And although our round-up has all the usual red and white themes you’d expect, there are some less predictable colours too, including pinks and purples. Likewise, while you’ll see plenty of roses, pinecones and eucalyptus, and you may be surprised to see some modern and unusual flowers such as the tropical leucadendron. 

So whether you’re looking for good value bunch or a stem-packed luxury arrangement, we’ve got it covered – and they’re all available to be delivered nationwide, too.

1. Beards & Daisies White Christmas: £34.99, Beards & Daisies

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You get a lot of bang for your buck with this bunch – and the mixture of white, blue and green give a clean, bright look to suit everything from uber-modern to country cottage. It includes roses, eryngium, baby’s breath and eucalyptus, and you can upgrade to a three-month subscription for just over twice the price. 

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2. Bloom & Wild The Gemma: £30, Bloom & Wild

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This florist is one of many that delivers bouquets in letter-box friendly packages, but they’re more carefully packed than others we’ve tried. This arrangement – which includes roses, hypericum, rosemary and the less predictable leucadendron – is a stunner that fits perfectly into any medium-sized vase. Ours lasted 10 days, helped by the fact that the roses arrived in-bud.

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3. Bloomon Christmas Bouquet: from £20.95, Bloomon

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Amsterdam-based Bloomon, which launched in the UK this year, isn’t like most florists. It uses its own growers, so the flowers are literally fresh from the field, which gives them great longevity. And it’s a subscription service, but because you can cancel anytime, you can essentially buy a one-off bunch. Our Christmas bouquet was really vibrant, including amaryllis, callicarpa and clematis among others. Available in small, medium or large, with the option of a matching vase.

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4. Wildabout Winter Warmth: from £60, Wildabout 

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This glorious mix of reds is a sight to behold. Available in three sizes (even the small one is generous), it includes anemone, piano roses, hydrangea, skimmia and – of course – berries. Ours arrived particularly beautifully packaged and ready to simply drop into a vase.

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5. Interflora Winter Foliage: £10, Ocado

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This evocative and contemporary red, green and white spray is really pretty, despite having no actual flowers. Instead, it includes white-tipped twigs, fir, berries and pine cones. It’s good value and will add a dash of festivity to any room in the house.  

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6. Moonpig Christmas Roses: £25, Moonpig

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This spray of red and white roses looks stunning against the delicate waxflowers, eucalyptus and red berries (and no need for nasty stains on the tablecloth as the berries aren’t real). A real conversation starter, it comes at a reasonable price and you can make it last longer by trimming the stems.

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7. Emma Bridgewater Christmas Jug: £52, Waitrose Florist

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The aroma of this one is unmistakeably festive, largely thanks to the cinnamon and pine. The aesthetics are spot on too, with British-grown tulips and eye-catching roses, both of which arrive in bud so you get a full week out of it. Best of all, the jug – made by Emma Bridgewater, one of Britain’s favourite pottery designers – is for keeps.

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8. Prestige Flowers Monet Snow Scene at Argenteuil Bouquet: £40, National Gallery 

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This florist has created a series of bouquets based on paintings in the National Gallery and the results are superb. Granted, the purples are rather more vibrant in this spray than in the more muted tones of the masterpiece itself, but the arrangement nonetheless grasps the essence of this well-known winter scene beautifully.

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9. Philippa Craddock Pheasant’s Hatch Bouquet: from £45, Philippa Craddock

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We think this florist stands head and shoulders above most when it comes to seasonal bouquets, with Craddock never failing to surprise. This flamboyant arrangement, which takes its name from the florist’s headquarters, includes rich purples, blues, greens and golds, giving it a truly regal feel. There are four different sizes available and the stems are thin, making even the largest bunch easy to fit in the vase.

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10. Flying Flowers White Christmas Bouquet: £31.99, Flying Flowers

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You get plenty of gorgeous seasonal flowers here – including roses, amaryllis, alstroemeria, hypericum and white wax flowers, along with some white-tipped pine cones for extra yuletide cheer. The resulting white, green and brown combination is reminiscent of a winter’s walk and we love the pop-up vase too, just in case you’re caught short without one of your own.

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11. Fortnum & Mason Romeo and Juliet: £90, Fortnum & Mason

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Ok, we know this is a lot to spend on flowers, particularly as the bouquet isn’t huge, but it won a place in our round-up for three reasons. First, the smell is nothing short of incredible; second, it is so tightly and elegantly organised that all we had to do was untie it in the vase and it arranged itself beautifully; and third, the quality is second-to-none. Plus, ours lasted 10 days.

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12. Marks & Spencer Christmas Sparkling Gold Bouquet: £35, Marks & Spencer  

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White and gold is a typically festive combo, and this generous array of blooms takes full advantage of it. It includes two types of white roses and gold-sprayed eucalyptus, while the half-glittered chrysanthemums provide a contemporary twist. The gold tissue paper wrapping finishes it off a treat, although it was a shame the roses in our one didn’t arrive in bud.

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13. Real Flowers Woodland Antique Christmas Bouquet: from £65, Real Flowers

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At first glance, the colours suggest this is more spring-like than winter-themed, but this clever florist has actually found some of the most delicate and scented garden roses and combined them with winter thistles, twigs, ivy and birch twigs to create a really graceful Christmas bunch. Available in four sizes.

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14. Lakeland Christmas Table Arrangement: £34.99, Lakeland 

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If you want a really festive bouquet that you simply lift out of the box and onto the table, this will do you proud. The copper-coloured pine cones are complemented by the tones of red and peach provided by the carnations, roses and skimmia – and it all comes arranged in a cheery red ceramic vase.

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15. Jamie Aston Winter White Bouquet: from £70, Jamie Aston

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This is seriously classy and has the biggest “wow” factor of all the sprays we tried. Available in three sizes, it is in fact only made up of four components – white roses, pine cones, frosted ferns and foliage – but it is gorgeous. Top tip: transfer the thick stems into your vase outside if you can as the frosted ferns can make a bit of a mess, although it’s well worth it.

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The Verdict: Christmas bouquets

If you prefer a more feminine, dainty spray, our vote goes to Emma Bridgewater Christmas Jug and Real Flowers Woodland Antique Christmas Bouquet. For something bold, it’s got to be the flamboyant Philippa Craddock Pheasant’s Hatch Bouquet. We’d choose Bloom & Wild’s Gemma for traditionalists, which has just a hint of modernity, while Beards and Daisies’ White Christmas is probably the best value for money.

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