12 best Valentine's Day flowers

Surprise your loved one with a beautiful, out-of-the-ordinary bunch

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The Independent Online

If you want to make a statement of love this Valentine’s Day – but you find a dozen red roses just a bit too conventional – then check out our recommendations for something less predictable, but just as beautiful. 

1. Philippa Craddock Juliet Bouquet: from £75, Selfridges

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We love this rich tapestry of feminine tones. The soft colours and delicate flowers – including pink roses, ranunculus, wax flowers, olive branches and eucalyptus – are exquisitely arranged and have a minimum of 20 stems in the smallest size, although you can get large (30 stems) and abundant (45 stems) too. The luxurious gift box and tissue paper add extra charm.  

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2. Appleyard Flowers Passion: from £49.99, Appleyard Flowers

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If ever a floral arrangement could be sexy, this is it. With black calla lilies, purple eustoma and red Grand Prix roses, it lives up to its name perfectly and you get plenty of blooms for the price. A great bouquet for letting someone know you really fancy them or just reminding your loved one that they still have the wow factor. 

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3. Aldi Valentine’s Tulips: £5, Aldi

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It sounds crass to be bargain hunting when it comes to Valentine flowers, but the truth is many of us need to watch our pennies. And anyway, this bouquet of bulbous, boldly-coloured tulips is far more abundant than many that are double the price. Moreover, they last far longer than many red roses. Also available in other colour combos. 

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4. Interflora Vera Wang Dreamy Romance: £60, Interflora

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These are every bit as romantic as red roses, but minus the cliché and with added chic. The deep purples, delicate creams and silvery whites complement each other perfectly and the presentation is suitably decadent, with lashings of branded tissue paper and a very posh box. We were disappointed to find they hike the price up by a tenner for the Valentine period, though. 

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5. Getting Personal Alstroemeria Bouquet: £26.99, Getting Personal

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Inca Lilies are a winner for people who like their Valentine flowers colourful and long-lasting. Ours was a cheery sight of flamboyant oranges, reds, pinks and whites, with 15 stems in total all tastefully presented in pastel wrapping. Incredibly, they were still going strong after three weeks.

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6. Moyses Stevens Fairy Tale: from £160, Moyses Stevens

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You’ll need to be seriously in love with someone to splash this much cash, but this extravagant and exotic spray of vanda orchids – a flower that represents love, beauty, luxury and strength – is utterly divine. It’s one of several Valentine bouquets that stand out among the collection from this royal warrant-holding florist that’s been going since 1876. Available in three sizes.

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7. Bloom & Wild The Adele: £32, Bloom & Wild

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If peaches and pastels are your thing, then you can’t go wrong with this delicate bouquet that’s been created just for this Valentine’s Day. Featuring green bell, peach lisianthus and white alstroemeria, ours came beautifully arranged, although disappointingly in no water or gel.

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8. Paul Thomas Red Anemones: from £70, Paul Thomas Flowers

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If you know someone who adores the brilliant red of Valentine’s, but finds the rose theme too predictable, then here’s the perfect solution – a generous posy of magnificent and uncommon red Italian anemones. Simple and minimalist, they come from one of the most luxurious florists in the country. Available in four different sizes.

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9. Lakeland Spring Teapot Bouquet: £39.99, Lakeland

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While some might argue this is twee, we think it is ideal for lovers of spring flowers, with the anemones, hyacinths, tulips, narcissus and eucalyptus all serving as an uplifting reminder that winter will soon be gone. The light blue teapot gives it an original edge and means that at least part of this romantic gesture is for keeps.

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10. Fortnum & Mason White Rose Bouquet: £60, Fortnum & Mason

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White roses are both dreamy and sophisticated, making them a fabulous option for Valentine’s, and this bouquet does them justice in a way that most other offerings don’t quite manage. Maybe it’s the highly perfumed freesias that act as a striking side-kick or the compact arrangement that has real attention to detail. Whatever it is, these are supremely spectacular.

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11. Marks & Spencer Autograph Bundle of Spring: £35, Marks & Spencer

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We love this relatively minimalistic and contemporary cerise arrangement of roses, anemones and ranunculus that can simply be dropped in a vase to make a magnificent display that will be a real eye-catcher in any style home. 

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12. Larry Walshe Spring Jewel Bouquet: from £85, Larry Walshe

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This is so perfectly spherical that you could almost mistake it for a bridal bouquet. Comprising of ruby red roses, spring tulips, astrantia and hypericum berries, it’s abundant, contemporary and extremely sophisticated, with a rich variety of textures and tones. A great alternative to posh roses from an award-winning florist. Available in three sizes.

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The Verdict: Valentine’s Day flowers 

At £75 (and that’s for the smallest bunch) Philippa Craddock’s Juliet Bouquet doesn’t come cheap, but take it from us that it’s worth every penny. With feminine tones and rich textures, it lasts well too. For something cheaper, Marks & Spencer Autograph Bundle of Spring is tastefully and charmingly designed, while Aldi’s Valentine Tulips are bargain of the century for a fine-looking bunch of Valentine tulips. For the ultimate bouquet, Moyses Stevens’ Fairy Tale is exactly that.

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