Five Best: Hotels for hikes

After a hard day's walking, there's nothing better than a night of luxury


Hotel Endsleigh, Devon

The former shooting lodge of the Dukes of Bedford on the edge of Dartmoor was refurbished in 2005 by Olga Polizzi. It is furnished in country house-goes-boutique chic style with panelling and wallpaper in the original Regency spirit, shutters and white blinds, and stylish pots of orchids. The 16-bedroom house is set in 108 acres by the River Tamar - with one of Britain's wildest national parks beyond.

Hotel Endsleigh, Milton Abbot, Tavistock, Devon (01822 870 000; www.hotelendsleigh.com). Doubles start at £200, including breakfast.

Clearvewe, Wales

The views of Monmouthshire's hills, woodlands and valleys from Clearvewe are stunning. This luxury B&B opened in June last year and offers three bedrooms and a comfy lounge in a beautifully converted old stone cart house. It is set in the heart of terrific walking country, with the Usk Valley on the doorstep and the Wye Valley within easy reach. What's more, this peaceful, rolling landscape is much overlooked, with most tourists beating a path to the coast and national parks of Wales.

Clearvewe, Ty Wilson Barn, Llangwm, Monmouthshire (01291 671 515; www.clearvewe.com). Doubles start at £70, including breakfast.

Moonfleet Manor, Dorset

The Jurassic Coast path (declared a Unesco world heritage site in 2001 - and at one time more tamely known as the Dorset Coast Path) lies at the end of the garden of this Georgian country house. Just beyond is Chesil Beach and The Fleet nature reserve. As well as offering great hiking opportunities, Moonfleet Manor is a super-sybaritic, family-friendly hotel. Its 36 bedrooms are decorated with a slightly wacky touch of Raj Victoriana. Its restaurant serves modern British/French cuisine.

Moonfleet Manor, Fleet, Near Weymouth, Dorset (01305 786 948; www.moonfleetmanorhotel.co.uk). Doubles start at £160, half board including daily newspaper.

Punch Bowl Inn, Cumbria

The Punch Bowl's position couldn't be prettier. The pastoral outlook is lovely and the opportunities for fell walks plentiful. Sister property to the much-loved Drunken Duck Inn at Ambleside, the olde worlde pub was given a stylish facelift in 2005. Its nine light, bright bedrooms feature exposed beams, flat-screen TVs, Roberts radios and underfloor heating, while downstairs is a restaurant and a buzzy bar. Two quieter, cosy rooms off the bar offer open fires.

The Punch Bowl Inn, Crosthwaite, Lyth Valley, Cumbria (01539 568 237; www.the-punchbowl.co.uk). Doubles start at £110, including breakfast, afternoon tea and daily newspaper.

Ardanaiseig Hotel, Argyll

Three miles down the road from Kilchrenan village, this 16-bedroom baronial manor house sits on the shores of Loch Awe. With wood panelling, log fires and art works, there's the atmosphere of a contemporary chic house. But the real joy is in striding out into the Highlands. Lochside walks start from the drawing room steps, while beyond the 100-acre woodland gardens there are vast hillscapes to roam, with Ben Cruachan - at 3,659ft - dominating. Maps and picnics can be provided.

Ardanaiseig Hotel, Argyll, Scotland (01866 833 333; www.ardanaiseig.com). Doubles start at £110, with breakfast.

News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
News
exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
comedyAs ‘Luxury Comedy’ returns, Noel Fielding on why mainstream success scares him and what the future holds for 'The Boosh'
Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Arts and Entertainment
'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
musicHis latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do our experts think he’s missed out?
Sport
New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
Travel
Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
Arts and Entertainment
booksThe best children's books for this summer
Life and Style
News to me: family events were recorded in the personal columns
techFamily events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped that
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn