Private view: Land of the free, home of the brave

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The Independent Online

The exhibition's title conjures up suspect images of cowboys riding home on the range; thankfully, though, the Crane Kalman Gallery's summer exhibition puts this line to different effect.

The exhibition's title conjures up suspect images of cowboys riding home on the range; thankfully, though, the Crane Kalman Gallery's summer exhibition puts this line to different effect.

Its theme is immigration, or at least artist immigrants: a selection of the many painters and sculptors who have adopted America as their home in the 20th century. The selection is particularly strong from the late 1930s and early 1940s - a time when many Europeans were arriving in America: some fleeing persecution from Nazi Germany, others simply chasing the American dream.

There's a fine early abstract by Arshile Gorky (or Vosdanig Manoog Adoian as he was known in Armenia), a George Grosz of an uptown couple from 1935, and two rare early works by Mark Rothko with their calligraphic, rather Miroesque markings.

Pictures of this sort aren't often seen in London, at least not in private galleries, and it is a worthy follow-up to the fine exhibition of American modernism mounted by the same gallery a couple of years ago. Worth a look.

'Land of the free, home of the brave', Crane Kalman Gallery, 128 Brompton Road, London SW3 (020-7225 1931) to 31 Aug

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