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cabinetseason of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round thatch-eves run.

To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune men's eyes , *** H ONE HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I HH TWO HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " HHH THREE HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I HHHH FOUR HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I * FIVE HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " nH SIX HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I nHH SEVEN HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I nHHH EIGHT HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " nHHHH NINE HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I nn ONE THOUSAND WORDS

CabinetSeason of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , *** H ONE HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I HH TWO HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " HHH THREE HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I HHHH FOUR HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I * FIVE HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " nH SIX HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I nHH SEVEN HUNDRED WORDS

I, all alone, beweep my outcast state, and trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, and look up on myself and cirse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, featured like him, like him with friends possessed, desiring this man's art and that man's scope, with what I most enjoy contented least,

TYet, in these thoughts myself almost despising, haply I thinkm on thee, and then my state, like to the lark at break of day arising from sullen earth sings hymns at heaven's gate. For thy sweet love rememebered such welath brings that then I nHHH EIGHT HUNDRED WORDS.

Scorn to vhange my state with kings. I met a travller from an an antique land who said, "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone stand in the desert.

"Near them on the sand, half sunk, a shattered visage lies whose frown and wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command tell that its sculptor well those passions read which yet survive, stamped on these lifless things, the hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.

T"And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings; look on my works, ye mighty and despair.' " nHHHH NINE HUNDRED WORDS

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun, conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

TTo bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees and fill alll fruit with ripeness to the core. To swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells with a sweet kernel, to set budding more an d still more later flowers for the bees until they think warm days will never cease for summer has o'er-brimmed thieir clammy cells. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes , I nn ONE THOUSAND WORDS

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