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Master Draughtsmen
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The Independent Online

Correggio and Parmigianino both lived in Parma during the early part of the 16th century, indeed Parmigianino almost certainly worked in the studio of the older painter, but while Correggio spent his whole life in the Po valley, his ambitious apprentice travelled to Rome to make his name.

Correggio and Parmigianino both lived in Parma during the early part of the 16th century, indeed Parmigianino almost certainly worked in the studio of the older painter, but while Correggio spent his whole life in the Po valley, his ambitious apprentice travelled to Rome to make his name.

They were two very different men, and their personalities are perfectly delineated by the British Museum's new exhibition of their drawings. Correggio only drew as a prelude to painting, whereas Parmigianino drew constantly, often trying out six or seven alternative poses on the same piece of paper.

At first, Parmigianino was influenced by Correggio's intimate versions of biblical scenes. In time, however, he developed a more dramatic style that included the mannerist "Madonna of the Long Neck", and frank nudes of both genders.

One such nude, of a recumbent male, finds an echo in an exuberant bacchanal, one of 13 Picasso linocuts that occupies an adjacent room. "Lust for Life" also includes a newly-accquired set of proofs of Picasso's masterpiece, Femme nue â la source.

'Master Draughtsmen of the Renaissance' & 'Lust for Life', British Museum, London WC1 (020-7323 8000)

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