A thousand women mobbed us: Susan de Muth in bed with Dreamboy Trevor

Click to follow
Indy Lifestyle Online
The Dreamboys are a glamour revue company whose dance routines involve stripping from a variety of costumes down to G-strings for an exclusively female audience. Trevor Goldstein, 25, has been a Dreamboy for three years. He lives in London.

IHAVE a recurring nightmare that I'm being chased by female vampires and that I'm naked. I think this has something to do with a terrifying experience I once had as a Dreamboy. We were mobbed one night in Newcastle. There were only five of us and the thousand women in the audience rushed the stage. I was trying to protect myself but they ripped all the buttons off my jeans and I had bleeding wounds from their nails. It took about 10 minutes for the bouncers to get us out.

Even on a normal night I often get grabbed by the audience. Sometimes so hard that my eyes water. They don't seem to realise that we've got feelings. Once a girl handcuffed herself to my G-string and the bouncers had to carry her backstage, with me in tow, while our manager got the key from her friend. I've had women hiding in my hotel room; one even pretended to be a reporter and started interviewing me at 3am. I was amazed in the beginning because you just don't realise that women can be that pushy.

We do get to meet some very nice girls, though. There are three who follow us wherever we go on tour. We call them the 'specials'. Two of them are married and one of them has glasses. We sometimes go out for a drink with them after a gig.

I met my last girlfriend at a show. She came up to have her photograph taken with me and we ended up living together for seven months. But it's very difficult to have a steady relationship and be a Dreamboy, even if you are loyal. She got really insecure and used to come along every time I was performing and accuse me of being interested in girls in the audience.

Of course, you do get a bit excited by all the attention, especially if you never rated yourself much before. In the beginning my excitement would sometimes become obvious, which was embarrassing. But that's just hard luck - you learn how to control yourself.

We get feminists who come up on the stage pretending they want their picture done with us. As soon as they get there they say they don't want their picture taken at all and start muttering and hurling insults at us, saying we're being degraded, manipulated and used. I don't mind because I know it's not true.

The first thing other guys always ask you is: 'Do you get to bed with lots of women?' They don't usually get aggressive. We did once get chased up the motorway after a show, by a guy in a Cortina waving a sawn-off shotgun, but that was exceptional. The worst reaction I've had apart from that was some drunk shouting 'poofter]'

I used to be a maintenance engineer, which was more of a nine-to- five sort of job. You don't get much sleep in this line of work. If we're travelling back to London after a gig I sometimes don't get to bed before 11am. The minute I'm home I have a long bath to wash away all the sweat, make-up and body oil. Once a week I shave my chest and legs.

I'm always on a high after a show. I hardly ever drink alcohol because I like to look after myself. Sex is a great way to wind down, but if I'm alone I read or watch a video. Sometimes I get some mates over for a water pistol fight, which gets rid of all that excess energy and is my idea of a really good end to the day.

My mother is a schoolteacher and my father is an artist. I think they were a bit disappointed with my choice of career. There have been times when I'm pulling down my G-string with 3,000 women screaming behind me and I suddenly think: 'What the hell am I doing?' I can't go on with this lifestyle forever - it would begin to be ridiculous at around 35.

One day I'd like my own family. My ultimate dream is to live in a nice house with a couple of kids and a wife. But I'm not ready for that yet.

(Photograph omitted)

Comments