Art 98: The next sensation?

A must for budding collectors of contemporary art, especially the hesitant - a selling exhibition of over 80 artists, some of them recent art school graduates, none of whom are represented by dealers. Titled ARTfutures, it is at the Contemporary Art Society's stand in ART98, the London Contemporary Art Fair sponsored by The Independent at the Business Design Centre in Islington, opening tomorrow and running until Sunday.

The Contemporary Art Society's role is to present new artworks to public galleries and museums. It was founded in 1910 as a response to the Tate Gallery's stuffy acquisitions policy. CAS representatives spend nine months of the year scouring artists' studios for fresh talent. Some of their purchases are sold to finance the Society.

According to CAS director Gill Hedley, every artwork in ARTfutures has the Society's seal of approval. Collectors also have the assurance that other works by artists they buy from will become part of public collections - one of the first stages in the art market's reputation-making process. Prices are mostly between pounds 100 and pounds 2,000: the CAS is able to buy cheaply because budding artists understand that they are being offered an audience - and that both public galleries and private buyers will be put in touch with their studios so that they can buy more.

This is the Society's first art market since its show at the Royal Festival Hall foyer two years ago - when the art walked off the walls. Since then, a bumper stock of purchases has built up. As soon as one is sold, it will be replaced by another and the stock will be rotated throughout the Fair. The sheer number and variety of works on offer means that you are unlikely to come away from it still unsure of what you like.

ART98 is open Wednesday-Thursday (10am-6pm), Friday-Saturday (10am-7pm) and Sunday (10am-4.30pm). Entry pounds 10, pounds 7.50 in advance. Concessions (on the door) pounds 5,

Here is the work of ARTfutures artists, selected by Ms Hedley:

1 Sharon Kivland: La Femme Barree (photograph, glass, red rope). Unmistakably anatomical, but puzzling. It's actually taken from a 19th-century French archive photograph of a welt artificially produced by doctors with pins on the back of a woman admitted to a mental institution with hysteria. They have written "Demence praecoce" (dementia praecox) across it. In the course of treatment, the patient would have been asked to describe what was on her back. However, amid her suffering, she is lifting her hair - "invitingly", according to Kivland, a 42-year-old lecturer in art and psychoanalysis at Sheffield Hallam University. CAS director Gill Hedley finds the photograph "gently erotic - and very covetable". Kivland's work is seen mainly in Canada, France and Switzerland. Price pounds 1,120, or as a multiple in an edition of 50, pounds 15.

2 Daniel Preece: Letter to America (oil on paper). References to the controversial American flag artist Jasper Johns, and to Alastair Cooke's long-running Radio 4 broadcasts. Preece, 27, graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art in 1993 and spent nine months, 1995-6, in the United States on a work-and-travel scholarship. He says the rectangles are little bits of America that you might send home like letters or postcards. Price pounds 340. His urban landscapes will also be on sale.

3 Hans Stofer: Honey (milk jug, silicon, bee). The silicon glues the real bee to the real Dutch milk jug. Since finding the dead, dessicated bee in the bowl of a glass Arts and Crafts ceiling lampshade, 40-year- old Swiss-born Stofer, an established jeweller, has spent the past two years emptying other people's lampshades of dead bees, wasps, flies and spiders, to immortalise in his artworks. His friends send him dead insects - the latest was a grasshopper. They feature in a series of postcards titled "Milk". Price pounds 400.

4 Permindar Kaur: Untitled - Orange Dress With Figures (polar fleece and copper). One of a growing number of makers of conceptual clothing, 32-year-old Kaur has also made ceiling-high beds on tall, spindly legs. You might be tempted to wear the dress, but Kaur warns that the couple's copper shoes clank. A Glasgow School of Art graduate, and one of the Hayward Gallery's Young Contemporaries, she has shown overseas and at the Whitechapel Gallery, and had a solo show at the Icon Gallery in 1996. Price pounds 1,200.

5 David Lilley: Architectural Fantasies (balsa wood). Ms Hedley discovered his intricate models, which play with gravity and perspective, in the cellars of the Mall Galleries. Lilley, 35, who graduated from the Royal Academy Schools four years ago, says: "They may look cute, but they are also vaguely threatening. If you inhabited one, you would find it strange and disturbing". He has exhibited in Barcelona. Ms Hedley says: "His work deserves to be better known here." Prices pounds 300-pounds 600.

6 Ana de Castro: High Heels (copper). Never mind the shoe fetishism, De Castro describes her shoes, sculpted from a single strand of copper wire, in the words of Paul Klee: "taking a line for a walk". She explains: "It's to do with drawing in space." Portuguese-born De Castro, 31, is on a post-graduate sculpture course at the Byam Shaw School of Art. She collects shoes. "I like the form, the way different shoes suggest different eras." Ms Hedley says: "The appeal of shoes is difficult to resist and we have a range for sale from children's sandals to stilettos." Price pounds 380.

7 Ania Grzesik: Jacques' Shiny Helmet (oil on canvas). Why Villeneuve? Grzesik, 24, who graduated first class from Chelsea College of Art and Design and is now studying for her masters in painting at the Slade School of Fine Art, has produced a series of iconic paintings dedicated to the Formula One driver. She says: "I started watching Formula One a couple of years ago. I was taken with Villeneuve as a character - he's so amazing- looking and he's his own trademark. It's an interesting piece of marketing." Price pounds 300.

8 Joanna Moss: Canonbury Square, Islington (acrylic on canvas). This painting of a fireplace is a realistic visual pun that has the feel of a 17th- century Old Master. One of Moss's fireplace paintings was hung in last year's John Moores paintings exhibition. Price pounds 2,000, bigger commissioned versions pounds 4,000.

9 Marty St James: Face: Metamorphosis (laser print on paper). St James's video portraits look like pictures in a gallery, but startle by springing to life, moving and talking. A graduate of three art schools, St James, who is in his forties, has made video portraits of Julie Walters, Sally Burgess, the mezzo-soprano, and Duncan Goodhew. Tokyo's Metropolitan Museum is showing 10 of his pieces and both the National Portrait Gallery and the Ferens Gallery in Hull have acquired his work. His laser prints, says Ms Hedley, "combine portraiture with the art of the patisseur". Price pounds 250.

10 Sarah Howard: Secret (oil on canvas). A wistful self-portrait paying homage to the style of Gerhard Richter. "I like this," says Howard, 22, who graduated in fine art from the University of Northumbria last year, "because it conveys the personality by mannerisms, without showing the face. That's why it's called "Secret" - it's half revealing." Price pounds 700.

Readers' Offer

Present this copy of The Independent at the ticket desk to gain entry to ART98 for only pounds 7.50

Voices
Mosul dam was retaken with the help of the US
voicesRobert Fisk: Barack Obama is following the jihadists’ script
Arts and Entertainment
Loaded weapon: drugs have surprise side effects for Scarlett Johansson in Luc Besson’s ‘Lucy’
filmReview: Lucy, Luc Besson's complex thriller
News
A cleaner prepares the red carpet for the opening night during the 59th International Cannes Film Festival May 17, 2006 in Cannes, France.
newsPowerful vacuum cleaners to be banned under EU regulations
News
people
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
ebooksA superb mix of recipes serving up the freshest of local produce in a delicious range of styles
Life and Style
ebooksFrom the lifespan of a slug to the distance to the Sun: answers to 500 questions from readers
News
A polar bear’s diet is rich in seal blubber and half of its own body weight is composed of fat
i100
News
London is the most expensive city in Europe for cultural activities such as ballet
arts
Travel
Flocking round: Beyoncé, Madame Tussauds' latest waxwork, looking fierce in the park
travelIn a digital age when we have more access than ever to the stars, why are waxworks still pulling in crowds?
Arts and Entertainment
Jeremy Clarkson has rejected criticisms of his language, according to BBC director of television Danny Cohen
tv
Extras
indybest
Arts and Entertainment
Judi Dench appeared at the Hay Festival to perform excerpts from Shakespearean plays
tvJudi Dench and Hugh Bonneville join Benedict Cumberbatch in BBC Shakespeare adaptations
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Sport
Is this how Mario Balotelli will cruise into Liverpool?
football
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs General

    Service Desk Analyst (Graduate, Helpdesk, Desktop, Surrey)

    Negotiable: Harrington Starr: Service Desk Analyst (Graduate, Helpdesk, Deskto...

    Service Desk Analyst (Graduate, Helpdesk, Desktop, Surrey)

    Negotiable: Harrington Starr: Service Desk Analyst (Graduate, Helpdesk, Deskto...

    Junior Quant Analyst - C++, Boost, Data Mining

    £25000 - £35000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Junior Quant Analyst - C++, Boost...

    Service Desk Analyst- (Desktop Support, Help desk)

    £25000 - £35000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Service Desk Analyst- (Desktop Su...

    Day In a Page

    Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

    Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

    The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
    Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

    Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

    A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
    Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

    Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

    Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
    Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

    Nick Clegg the movie

    Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
    Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

    Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

    Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
    Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

    Waxing lyrical

    Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
    Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

    Revealed (to the minute)

    The precise time when impressionism was born
    From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

    Make the most of British tomatoes

    The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
    10 best men's skincare products

    Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

    Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
    Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

    Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

    The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
    La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

    Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

    Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
    Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

    We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

    Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
    Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

    Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

    Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
    Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

    The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

    Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
    Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

    Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

    Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape