The Saturday Miscellany: How to organise the office party; pet rabbits; Ian Rankin's bookshelf; JFK on girls

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How to: Sort the office party

By Oscar Quine

'Tis the season to organise the office party. Charli Burnage, events manager at party planners Collection 26, gives these three gift-wrapped tips to set the celebrations off in festive stead. Now, to wipe down the photocopier...

"Cocktails are a must-have at any Christmas celebration. Get creative – think mince pie martini or a warming roast chestnut toddy, to get even the toughest boss merry."

"Ensure you have a well thought-out playlist, filled with a mixture of upbeat tracks and a few Christmas classics. Be sure not to be too cheesy with your choices, though – you don't want to turn your elegant celebration into a tacky disco."

"No work the next day! Nobody likes to work with a hangover and this will ensure that all your colleagues can kick back, relax and enjoy the celebrations without the worry of leaving early and sober."

Rotating column: On pet rabbits

By Alexander Fury

Owning a rabbit is a bit like having a baby. A furry, generally quite grumpy baby. At least, mine is. They make no noise – unless frightened (a scream; I've never heard it) or annoyed (they grunt; I've heard it often). And, contrary to popular belief, they don't poo everywhere. Mine even uses a litter tray.

That's important because my rabbit is a house bunny.

His full name is Miss Latrice Royale. He's named after a drag queen. I did think he was a she, but the vet reliably informed me otherwise.

Rabbits are difficult to read. Generally, they're quite indifferent – although, the good thing is, when you talk, their ears literally prick up. And you end up talking to a rabbit a lot. It's like cheap psychotherapy. They'll also dance with you when you're drunk. See. Perfect pets.

Micro extract: JFK on girls

"I received a letter from Marion Kingsland. She saw Joe [Jr] in New York with 'two of the most beautiful English girls she had ever seen'. I hope, if Joe is planning to leave, he will leave a programme with the names and numbers of the leading players…"

From The Letters of John F Kennedy, edited by Martin W Sandler (Bloomsbury, £20)

Instant ethics

By Ellen E Jones

Dear Ellen

Q. I've heard a rumour that the new girl at work was fired from her last job for stealing. Should I tell the boss?

A. No. This kind of gossip-mongering sends your boss a clear signal that you don't have enough work to do. Busy yourself elsewhere. For all you know, she may have come clean and got the job anyway.