Feelgood factor: Dr Andrew Lockie

I get up at about six o'clock and splash my face with cold water. I go back into my bedroom and wrap a huge red and blue Masai blanket around me and meditate. I have been meditating for about an hour every morning for more than 20 years. I can retreat into my imagination to a place that is relaxed, peaceful and still.

I don't think it helps me to use visualisation techniques at all. Some people find that if they picture somewhere safe and relaxing in their mind, it helps them to meditate. It's really a case of doing what suits you. I just let my thoughts go and leave my mind to do what it wants and disengage from it. Eventually, I just go deeper and deeper inside myself. You can't stop yourself thinking about the money situation, or that the car needs fixing or whatever. I just let all this noise carry on in my head and don't let myself follow any particular train of thought.

It's not like falling straight back asleep, as I am very aware of what's going on. It's a different state of consciousness - very calm and safe. Meditating is instantly gratifying. I'm not intrinsically good at doing things that require a great deal of discipline. There has to be some kind of reward that is more or less immediate; meditating provides that, making me feel hugely refreshed and setting me up for the day. When people come to my practice, I find it easier to take their problems on board and I can concentrate completely on helping them.

Interview by NICK WALKER

The writer is co-author of `The Complete Guide to Homeopathy', published by Dorling Kindersley, pounds 16.99.

Comments