Bites

Revolving sushi
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Indy Lifestyle Online

Ubon, like Nobu, takes a stationary approach to sushi - and an expensive one. The revolving sushi bar with conveyor belt bearing plates priced according to a colour code is a populist movement that's picking up momentum. Roll 'em.

Ubon, like Nobu, takes a stationary approach to sushi - and an expensive one. The revolving sushi bar with conveyor belt bearing plates priced according to a colour code is a populist movement that's picking up momentum. Roll 'em.

Itsu, 103 Wardour Street, London W1 (020-7479 4794). Mon-Thur 12-11pm, Fri, Sat 12-12, Sun 12-10pm. Second branch of the Westernised version of kaiten from the man behind Pret a Manger. Design's smart, music's a little loud, salmon's organic and dishes are striking: beef carpaccio rolled in rice paper with citrus dip; crayfish and coriander seaweed cone; hijiki chicken slices in a mustardy (wasabi not Colman's) sauce; crÿme brulée or orange with white chocolate yogurt and pistachios to finish. Around £15.

Kulu Kulu, 76 Brewer Street, London W1 (020-7734 7316). Mon-Sat lunch and dinner. On Soho's little Tokyo strip, this is the real kaiten sushi thing. It doesn't shout it out loud but keeps a constantly replenished supply of cut-above sushi in circulation for a largely Japanese clientele. Vegetable plates such as green beans or spinach with sesame seeds are good; grilled chicken, tofu and prawns ring the changes, but the sushi's what makes it special and prices are keen for the quality. Finish with artfully-chopped fresh fruit. Plates cost £1.20 to £3.

Moshi Moshi, Bartholomew Square, Brighton, Sussex (01273 719195). Sun-Wed 12-10pm, Thur-Sat 12-11pm. Moshi Moshi started it all, has two sushi shops in the City, one far-from-brief counter snaking lengthily in Canary Wharf, and now this in the newly aggrandised city of Brighton and Hove. A great spot, it's in a wooden-framed tea house with only the Thistle Hotel between the sushi and the sea. Inside, fresh and good plates cost £1.20 to £2.90; hot plates can be ordered and temaki rolls made. A four-year-old described the putty-like pink bean-curd balls filled with peanut butter as "ghastly"; as a preferable alternative, there's ice cream for pudding.

Oko, 68 Ingram Street, Glasgow (0141-572 1500). Daily 12pm-12am. Scotland's first, opened with backing from Jim Kerr, is a slap in the face with spanking fresh fish for the nation's reputation for unhealthy eating. Sleek, with dark wood and chrome, it offers passers by a spectacle through huge windows. Recommended: chicken udon soup; salmon teriyaki on a cake of mashed potato; temaki - seafood-filled cones of papery seaweed; fruit spring rolls filled with papaya and banana. Up to £20 a head. Drink Asahi beer, New World wines, coffee. Or Irn Bru.

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