The ripple effect: Skye Gyngell's tongue-tingling raspberries recipes

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

Nothing says summer more than the arrival of the first raspberries; blood-red in colour, tart and sweet at the same time, and deliciously velveteen in texture and appearance. The first batch of this lovely fruit should be eaten in the simplest way – put them in a bowl, drizzle over a little thick cream and a dusting of sugar – the gratifying flavour of an English summer in one simple dish.

Later in the season, raspberries are great combined with softer, sweeter fruits such as peaches, nectarines, or ripe green figs, or baked in an open-topped tart. They also make a very good ice-cream or sorbet and can be combined with redcurrants and stale bread to make that quintessentially English dessert, summer pudding.

Later in the summer my very favourite raspberries of all – known as Tulameen – begin to appear at Petersham. Their flavour is more mellow, less tart, sweet and luxurious; we combine them with creamy, rich and soft Wigmore cheese and a drizzle of honey; a slightly surprising combination but nevertheless one of the nicest I know.

Like many of the most delicious berries, raspberries are delicate and can't be stored for long. They are too fragile to be washed, so buy only those that have not been sprayed with pesticides. Carefully empty out the punnets on to kitchen paper, and discard any that show signs of bruising or mould. Carefully pick off any stems or leaves and eat as soon as possible.

If you have a glut in your garden, you can freeze them for future use in sauces or ice-cream: simply lay out on trays and place in the freezer; once frozen they can be transferred to plastic bags and returned to the freezer. Squashed raspberries or those not used right away can be crushed with sugar and boiled to make jam.

Skye Gyngell is head chef at Petersham Nurseries, Church Lane, Richmond, Surrey, tel: 020 8605 3627

Almond tart with raspberries and crème fraîche

This simple tart combines well with most fruits that have a slight acidity – the tart itself is chewy and sweet, so raspberries make the perfect foil.

Serves 8

For the pastry

125g/4oz unsalted butter
250g/8oz plain flour
25g/1oz caster sugar
1 whole organic free-range egg
1/2tsp vanilla extract
1tsp iced water

For the almond filling

300g/10oz whole blanched almonds
300g/10oz unsalted butter
300g/10oz caster sugar
1/2tsp vanilla extract
6 organic free-range eggs
The zest of one unwaxed lemon

To serve

1 punnet of raspberries
Crème fraîche

For the pastry, make sure the butter is cold, and dice into small pieces. Sift the flour and place in a food mixer; add the butter, sugar, egg and vanilla extract. Turn the motor on and pulse until you have the consistency of wet sand. At this stage add the water; the pastry will soon begin to come together and form a ball. Turn off the machine and remove the ball of pastry to a work surface; knead lightly once or twice and wrap in parchment paper. Place in the fridge to chill for 30 minutes.

Once it is chilled, lightly flour your work surface and roll the pastry into a circle about an eighth of an inch thick. Line a 10-inch tart tin, pressing the pastry firmly into the side of the tin with your thumbs. Prick the base well all over with a fork and return to the fridge to chill for a further 30 minutes.

While the pastry is chilling, make the almond filling. Place the almonds into a food processor and pulse until ground. Add the butter, sugar and vanilla extract and purée until smooth. Add the eggs one by one through the funnel in the top and finally add the lemon zest. Remove from the mixer and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas6 and blind bake the pastry case for 15 minutes (to do this, lay a circle of greaseproof paper across the pastry and weigh down with dried beans).

Remove from the oven, discard the beans and fill with the almond paste. Return to the middle shelf of the oven. Turn down the heat to 180C/350F/Gas4 and bake for 30 minutes or until firm in the centre. Remove from the oven and cool to room temperature.

Serve the tart with a spoonful of crème fraîche for each person and a scattering of raspberries.

Apricot and raspberry sherbet

This dessert is deliciously refreshing and not too sweet – a great end to a heavy meal.

Serves 6-8

200g/7oz apricots
180g/6oz caster sugar
200g/7oz raspberries
120ml/4fl oz light, fruity red wine
A small pinch of salt
40ml/11/2fl oz double cream

Using a sharp knife, slice the apricots in half and remove the stones; place the halved apricots into a saucepan and add the sugar, pour in just enough water to cover the fruit and place over a medium heat. Bring to a boil then turn down to a simmer. Cook the fruit for just under 10 minutes – it should be soft and almost falling apart. Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature.

When the fruit is cool, place the mixture in a blender with the raspberries and wine. Add the pinch of salt and purée until smooth. Strain through a colander into a clean bowl and stir in the cream.

Place in an ice-cream maker and follow the manufacturer's instructions or, if you don't have a machine, put in a plastic container in the freezer and stir with a fork every 20 minutes – to stop icicles forming – until frozen.

Meringue with sweet cream and raspberries

Makes 8 medium-sized meringues

For the meringue

6 organic free-range egg whites
Small pinch of salt
360g/12oz caster sugar
3/4 tsp vanilla extract

For the sweet cream

180ml/6fl oz double cream
1tbsp icing sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
200g/7oz raspberries

Preheat the oven to 150C/300F/Gas2. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Put the egg whites (make sure they're at room temperature) in a clean, dry bowl and add the salt. Using an electric or balloon whisk beat the egg whites, slowly at first until they break down and begin to froth slightly. Increase the speed and continue until stiff peaks form. Add the sugar a spoonful at a time and finally beat in the vanilla. Place spoonfuls of the meringue mixture on the baking tray, spacing them evenly apart to allow for them to expand. Place in the oven and immediately turn down to 120C/250F/ Gas1/2 and cook for 45 minutes, then turn off the heat and leave to cool completely before removing. If you're not using them straight away, they can be kept in an airtight container for up to three days.

To make the sweet cream, place the cream in a bowl and whisk until just soft. Add the sugar and vanilla and stir well to combine. Place the raspberries in another bowl and, using the back of a fork, press down on them gently to release the juice and lightly crush them. Stir the crushed raspberries into the cream.

Arrange the meringues on a plate and spoon the raspberry cream over them. Serve immediately.

Roasted figs with raspberries

Green figs are sweet ripe and plump right now, roasted quickly in the oven they make a simple light dessert. The gentle acidity of the uncooked raspberries works really nicely here.

Serves 4

4 large ripe green figs
The juice of one orange
1 tbsp Pedro Ximénez (optional – but don't substitute with another sweet sherry; this will give the best results)
11/2tbsp honey
1 punnet of raspberries

Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas4. Slice the figs in half and lay on a roasting tray, cut-side up. Place the orange juice, sherry and honey in a bowl and mix together to combine. Pour over the figs and place the roasting tray on the middle shelf of the oven. Roast for 15 minutes or until the figs are soft, almost bubbling and slightly caramelised around the edges. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. When cool, place in the fridge to chill; they are nicest served slightly cold.

Arrange attractively on a plate and scatter the raspberries over the top. Serve with a dollop of rich thick Jersey cream.

The Forager by Wendy Fogarty

Petersham's food sourcer on where to find the best raspberries...

Pick Your Own provides a searchable list of berry growers and farm shops around the country (www.pickyourown.org).

Bouvrage is a natural, gently sparkling raspberry drink made in Alloa, Scotland, from local berries (www.bouvrage.com)

Benson's sells its apple and raspberry juice by mail order and at farmers' markets (www.bensonsapplejuice.co.uk)

Trevervan Jams are made by Jo Smith in Cornwall. Available by mail order (Tel: 01840 770 486)

Cottage Pride's award-winning Irish raspberry jam is made in small batches to a traditional family recipe in County Omagh (www.irishgourmet.co.uk)

Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookPart of The Independent’s new eBook series The Great Composers
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Food & Drink

    SFL Group: Video Project Manager

    £24,000 pa, plus benefits: SFL Group: Looking for a hard-working and self-moti...

    Recruitment Genius: Hotel Reservations Assistant - French Speaking

    £16000 - £17000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This rapidly expanding travel c...

    Recruitment Genius: Duty Manager - World-Famous London Museum

    £24000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Do you have a strong record of ...

    Recruitment Genius: Personal Assistant

    £24000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: You will have demonstrable unde...

    Day In a Page

    No postcode? No vote

    Floating voters

    How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
    Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

    By Reason of Insanity

    Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
    Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

    Power dressing is back

    But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
    Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

    Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

    Caves were re-opened to the public
    'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

    Vince Cable interview

    'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
    Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

    Promises, promises

    But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
    The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

    The death of a Gaza fisherman

    He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
    Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

    Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

    Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
    Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

    The only direction Zayn could go

    We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
    Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

    Spells like teen spirit

    A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
    Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

    If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

    British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
    Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

    Licence to offend in the land of the free

    Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
    From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

    From farm to fork in Cornwall

    One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
    Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

    Robert Parker interview

    The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
    Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

    Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

    We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor