Bubbly women bottle out at opening time

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Indy Lifestyle Online

When it comes to opening champagne, women lose their bottle, it seems. Fully 75 per cent leave uncorking the bubbly to a man. And the chaps, all too keen to show their hunter-gatherer side by braving the dangers of a volatile cork, are never reluctant to oblige.

When it comes to opening champagne, women lose their bottle, it seems. Fully 75 per cent leave uncorking the bubbly to a man. And the chaps, all too keen to show their hunter-gatherer side by braving the dangers of a volatile cork, are never reluctant to oblige.

Half the 500 women in a Marks & Spencer survey feared that the cork would become a dangerous projectile, hitting them or a valuable ornament. But men are not quite as clever as they think they are.

Françoise Peretti, spokeswoman for the Champagne Information Bureau, said: "Men end up breaking the cork because they don't do it properly. Women are more cautious - but when you tell them how to do it, they listen carefully and are able to do it."

Chris Murphy of Marks & Spencer explains: "Champagne should be opened with a sigh, not a loud pop ... Holding the bottle at 45 degrees, slowly ease the cork by twisting the bottle and control the release of gas by gradually releasing the pressure of your hand on top of the cork."

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