Favourite restaurant of the Sloanes closed down – because landlord choked on his bill

Earl Cadogan refuses to renew lease on celebrated London brasserie because 'the prices were too high'

Most diners who have been on the receiving end of a dodgy steak or limp salad would be content to simply send the dish back (or endure it, grudgingly, in a non-confrontational British silence). The more incensed may even decide to treat the "optional service charge" as just that.

Not many would go so far as to close down the restaurant. But Earl Cadogan, the property landlord for the Oriel brasserie in upmarket Sloane Square in west London, was so unimpressed with the place when he ate there that he has decided to do just that.

Sloane rangers will have to find a new eatery in which to see and be seen after his company, Cadogan Estates, confirmed yesterday that it will not renew Oriel's lease when it ends.

An Old Etonian, Charles Cadogan said that he "didn't like the food and the prices were too high", adding: "I can tell you that we won't be renewing their lease when it expires .... We are going to have a new development there."

Earl Cadogan and family are ranked 14th in the most recent Sunday Times Rich List. The Earl, who inherited the title from his father in 1997, embarked on a significant property investment programme and now owns 90 acres of some of London's most expensive land. He is believed to be worth £2bn. The former Chelsea Football Club chairman's value apparently shrunk by around £930m last year, although he still moved up three places from 17th in the list.

Cadogan Estates will now look for another restaurant – one that can satisfy the Earl's palate – to replace Oriel once refurbishment of the building is completed in about 18 months.

The brasserie, which has been part of the bustle of Sloane Square for around 25 years, has received mixed reviews recently. The London restaurant guide Harden's gives its food a 5 – the lowest possible rating – while its service does not fare much better at 4. The brasserie's ambience is rated a 3.

Customers commenting on the review website london-eating.co.uk were also lukewarm. One said: "Food was as expected but the service was appalling. It took three attempts to obtain two glasses of tap water. The glasses did eventually appear as we completed our main courses." Another wrote: "Nearly an hour's wait for main course, despite repeated protestations that 'the chef is cooking it now.' Rude. No apology. Just dreadful – we left."

However, some users disputed claims that the brasserie was poor. "Very friendly chap served us for lunch today, nice lunchy type men," said one.

A group of Sloane Square residents has also reportedly set up a petition against the brasserie's closure. Financier Richard Elliot-Square said: "There are lots of people who don't want it to go."

Oriel's parent company, Tragus, which also owns Café Rouge, called the news "sad". The group had previously insisted that it would take the battle to keep the restaurant open to the courts. But a spokesman confirmed yesterday that the restaurant will close.

"We hope that Cadogan Estates will listen to customers and residents to reconsider how Oriel can be part of the future plans for the site," the spokesman said.

The brasserie would not be the first long-term Sloane Square tenant to get on the wrong side of its landlord. In 2004, WHSmith complained that Cadogan Estates had broken its tenancy agreement when the stationer was told to leave after more than 130 years.

The Cadogan dynasty

*The family is descended from Major William Cadogan. The first Earl was a a cavalry officer in Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army.



*In 1723, the 13-year-old daughter of the Earl of Cadogan was married off to the son of the Duke of Richmond to pay off her father-in-law's gambling debts. Her betrothed is said to have taken one look at her before leaving on a tour of Europe. After returning, he saw a beautiful woman at the opera and later realised that she was his wife. They became a devoted couple.



*The fifth Earl was a Tory who held office under Benjamin Disraeli and later Lord Salisbury as Under-Secretary of State for War, Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, Lord Privy Seal and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. His son, Henry Cadogan, was MP for Bury St Edmunds until his death in 1908.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
ebooksA superb mix of recipes serving up the freshest of local produce in a delicious range of styles
Life and Style
ebooksFrom the lifespan of a slug to the distance to the Sun: answers to 500 questions from readers
Sport
David Moyes gets soaked
sport Moyes becomes latest manager to take part in the ALS challenge
Life and Style
techCould new invention save millions in healthcare bills?
Voices
A meteor streaks across the sky during the Perseid Meteor Shower at a wind farm near Bogdanci, south of Skopje, Macedonia, in the early hours of 13 August
voicesHagel and Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise, says Robert Fisk
News
peopleEnglishman managed quintessential Hollywood restaurant Chasen's
Life and Style
food + drinkHarrods launches gourmet food qualification for staff
Arts and Entertainment
Michael Flatley prepares to bid farewell to the West End stage
danceMichael Flatley hits West End for last time alongside Team GB World champion Alice Upcott
News
Members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community walk with a rainbow flag during a rally in July
i100
Life and Style
Black Ivory Coffee is made using beans plucked from elephants' waste after ingested by the animals
food + drinkFirm says it has created the "rarest" coffee in the world
Arts and Entertainment
Jamie T plays live in 2007 before going on hiatus from 2010
arts + entsSinger-songwriter will perform on the Festival Republic Stage
Life and Style
food + drinkThese simple recipes will have you refreshed within minutes
News
Jermain Defoe got loads of custard
i100
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Food & Drink

    Oracle 11g SQL 2008 DBA (Unix, Oracle RAC, Mirroring, Replicati

    £6000 - £50000 per annum + Bonus+Benefits+Package: Harrington Starr: Oracle 11...

    Recruitment Consultant (Graduate Trainee), Finchley Central

    £17K OTE £30K: Charter Selection: Highly successful and innovative specialist...

    SQL DBA/ C# Developer - T-SQL, C#.Net

    £45000 - £55000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Working with an exciting ...

    Sales and Office Administrator – Sports Media

    £23,000: Sauce Recruitment: A global leader in sports and entertainment is now...

    Day In a Page

    All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

    Robert Fisk: All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

    Chuck Hagel and Martin Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise
    Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

    Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

    So claims an EU report which points to the Italian Mob’s alleged grip on everything from public works to property
    Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

    Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

    Once the poor relation, the awards show now has the top stars and boasts the best drama
    French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

    French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

    The ugly causeway is being dismantled, an elegant connection erected in its place. So everyone’s happy, right?
    Radio 1 to hire 'YouTube-famous' vloggers to broadcast online

    Radio 1’s new top ten

    The ‘vloggers’ signed up to find twentysomething audience
    David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

    David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

    A blistering attack on US influence on British television has lifted the savvy head of Channel 4 out of the shadows
    Match of the Day at 50: Show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition

    Tom Peck on Match of the Day at 50

    The show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition
    Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

    Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

    The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
    Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

    Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

    A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
    Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

    Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

    Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
    Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

    Nick Clegg the movie

    Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
    Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

    Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

    Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
    Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

    Waxing lyrical

    Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
    Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

    Revealed (to the minute)

    The precise time when impressionism was born
    From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

    Make the most of British tomatoes

    The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes