Serves 4

Using olive oil can be a tasty alternative to poaching in water or a court bouillon. The oil is then used in the dressing and sauce, so it's not being extravagant with it. Any leftover oil can be strained, frozen and used again several times. This recipe is simple and seasonal f and doesn't involve ages spent over the stove. Use as many types of asparagus, and samphire, as you can get your hands on. I've used sprue and corn ear asparagus here but you could use thicker green, wild and white. A good fishmonger should be able to get wild sea trout for you, otherwise you could bite the bullet and use salmon - try to find organically farmed.

Using olive oil can be a tasty alternative to poaching in water or a court bouillon. The oil is then used in the dressing and sauce, so it's not being extravagant with it. Any leftover oil can be strained, frozen and used again several times. This recipe is simple and seasonal and doesn't involve ages spent over the stove. Use as many types of asparagus, and samphire, as you can get your hands on. I've used sprue and corn ear asparagus here but you could use thicker green, wild and white. A good fishmonger should be able to get wild sea trout for you, otherwise you could bite the bullet and use salmon - try to find organically farmed.

4 portions of sea-trout fillet weighing about 160g, skinned and boned
150-200ml olive oil plus 150-200ml vegetable oil or enough equal amounts of each to cover the fish
1tsp fennel seeds
1 bay leaf
A few sprigs of thyme
10 black peppercorns
2tsp sea salt
1¿2tbsp chopped chives
1¿2tbsp chopped chervil
1¿2tbsp chopped parsley
250-300g sprue asparagus, woody ends trimmed

for the sauce

1 egg yolk
1tsp good quality white wine vinegar
150ml strained oil from cooking the fish
1tbsp water
Juice of half a lemon
Salt and freshly ground white pepper

In a pan large enough to fit the fish, combine equal amounts of olive and vegetable oil with the fennel seeds, bay leaf, thyme, peppercorns and salt. Heat the oil gently over a low heat for about 5 minutes then remove and leave to cool and infuse for 30 minutes.

Warm the oil up again on a low heat for 5 minutes, then immerse the sea-trout fillets in the oil and return to a low heat and cook them for 3-4 minutes. Leave to cool in the liquid. This should keep the sea trout nice and pink, if you want it well done, which I wouldn't recommend, then cook it in the oil for a couple more minutes.

Meanwhile cook the asparagus in boiling, salted water for 2-3 minutes, or until tender. Remove with a slotted spoon and plunge into cold water for a minute before draining in a colander.

Remove the sea trout from the oil and put the fillets on a plate. Strain about 150ml of the oil into a small jug. Put the egg yolk into a bowl and whisk it with the wine vinegar then gradually trickle in the strained oil, whisking continuously until all the oil has been added. Whisk in the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper if necessary.

Strain another 3 tablespoons of the oil into a bowl with the chives, chervil and parsley, and season with salt and pepper. Mix two thirds of this oil with the asparagus and arrange on plates. Put the sea trout on top and spoon over the rest of the oil. Serve the sauce separately with some hot, buttered Jersey Royals.

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