Serves 4

Many people turn their nose up at plaice because it reminds them of a plateful of over-grilled pappy white flesh and bones last seen in a seaside pub that wants you to think it was caught just outside the door. If you can get your hands on a beautiful large, fresh one, it's-I can't think of another way of saying this-a different kettle of fish. A good sized plaice of 2kg-plus has delicious firm flesh similar to that of a turbot or brill, but they are less common as they are normally caught by divers and sold to restaurants. If you can't get hold of a larger plaice then you'll have to buy brill or turbot steak, although it will set you back a bob or two more.

Many people turn their nose up at plaice because it reminds them of a plateful of over-grilled pappy white flesh and bones last seen in a seaside pub that wants you to think it was caught just outside the door. If you can get your hands on a beautiful large, fresh one, it's-I can't think of another way of saying this-a different kettle of fish. A good sized plaice of 2kg-plus has delicious firm flesh similar to that of a turbot or brill, but they are less common as they are normally caught by divers and sold to restaurants. If you can't get hold of a larger plaice then you'll have to buy brill or turbot steak, although it will set you back a bob or two more.

Sea kale is another rarity that is finding its way on to some serious restaurant menus. You can get it in specialist greengrocers like L Booth in London's Borough market. If not, baby leeks make a good substitute.

4 x 250-350g steaks, cut on the bone, from a large plaice
Olive oil for grilling
150-200g sea kale, trimmed
60g butter
1tbsp chopped chervil
Salt and freshly ground white pepper
1 lemon cut into 4 wedges

Pre-heat a grill or ribbed griddle pan. Brush the fish with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill for about 5-6 minutes on each side - if you are using a griddle pan, you may need to finish the fish off in a moderate oven. Test the fish by inserting a metal skewer or small knife into the centre, near the bone. The skewer or tip of the knife should come out hot. If not, give the fish a few more minutes.

Meanwhile, cook the sea kale in boiling salted water for 2-3 minutes until just cooked, then drain in a colander. Melt the butter in a pan, add the sea kale and chervil, season and serve on the plate with the fish or separately with a wedge of lemon. New potatoes such as Anya or Pink Fir Apple will go nicely.

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