Lobster drop scones

Serves 2
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Occasionally, you will come across a female lobster that when you cook it has a lot of black-looking gunk in and near the head. Don't be alarmed, this is unformed roe or coral and can be put to good use. If you have overcooked your lobster, it will be bright red – cooked to perfection or slightly under and it will be black.

Ideally, use this roe to make these drop scones, but if your lobster doesn't contain any, don't worry, it won't alter the taste, it just changes the colour of them a little as they cook.

The meat from about a quarter of a cooked lobster
The brains and meat scooped out of the head of the lobster
1tbsp good-quality mayonnaise
A good pinch of cayenne pepper
Some diced chilli
A couple of sprigs of coriander

For the drop scones

60g gluten- and wheat-free self-raising flour
1 small egg, beaten
100-120ml milk
The unformed coral/roe from the lobster, if it has any

Put the flour into a mixing bowl, mix in the egg and enough of the milk to form a smooth, thick batter, then stir in the roe and season.

Heat a non-stick frying pan and rub it with a little vegetable oil. Drop a couple of tablespoonfuls of the batter into the pan and let the scones cook for 3 minutes, until bubbles rise, then turn them over and cook for another 2-3 minutes.

You will have some extra mix here if there are just two of you eating, so keep the mix in the fridge or make teaspoon-sized ones and freeze them for a snack.

While the drop scones are cooking, cut the lobster into four slices. Mix the brains and meat from the head with the mayonnaise and cayenne pepper.

To serve, place a drop scone on to a small serving plate, spoon some of the mayonnaise on top, then a couple of slices of the lobster on the mayonnaise, and a sprig of coriander on top.

You can also added some diced chilli in there, too, if you fancy a little extra kick.