The Artichoke 9 Market Square, Old Amersham, Bucks

It may be tucked away in an olde-worlde small town, but The Artichoke has the Michelin inspectors in its sights

What should a "neighbourhood" restaurant be like? Somewhere that relies on repeat custom, rather than tourists and passers-by; friendly staff who remember you; a familiar yet evolving menu to keep things interesting; and prices that signify a treat, but that aren't beyond your reach.

To put one such place to the test, I visit The Artichoke in Buckinghamshire. Within striking distance of London, but sprawling enough to be called countryside, this neighbourhood has a certain "gin and Jag" feel – perfect for a smart restaurant with ambitions for both culinary plaudits and love from its locals. The Artichoke opened in 2002 and quickly gained attention for chef Laurie Gear's accomplished cooking. But a fire in 2008 closed the place for 16 months – plenty of opportunity for the South Bucks set to find a new favourite.

The first clue to how it is faring comes when trying to book a table – I have Sunday lunch in mind but The Artichoke doesn't open on Sunday, which seems like wilful dereliction of duty. It takes some courage to halve the potential weekend take.

So it's Saturday lunch we arrive for, at 2pm, the only available time despite two weeks' notice. Things must be going well. Then again, when you only have about 10 tables, it's easy to be fully booked.

The tiny room is a deft mix of olde worlde and crisp newness – Clare Nelson (who also did the award-friendly Ledbury) revamped it after the fire and was smart enough to keep the timbers in place, but team them with subtle glass panelling, angular upholstered chairs and white-painted exposed brickwork. The effect is of right place, right time.

A three-course set lunch at £22.50 is the big draw, but there are some very promising dishes on the à la carte menu too. Luckily, our party of four is able – and willing – to cover most of the modern European list.

Before I go any further, The Artichoke has one big drawback. The maître d', though perfectly professional, has a touch of the automaton. It's not because we are first-time townies: he seems the same with some regulars who have popped back to note down the wine they'd had earlier in the week. Courteous, but lacking in warmth. Sorry, mister, but that's how it felt to me.

If The Artichoke has its eyes on the Michelin prize, perhaps it should allow his co-host to take centre stage. She works the room, burnishing relationships with the regulars like nobody's business.

On to the food. An amuse-bouche – a shot glass of fresh pineapple juice with a coconut foam that should be too sickly but isn't – inspires the child in the party to ask for (and get) seconds. Then she tucks into the set menu. From a choice of three dishes at each course, she has creamed spinach and Parmesan soup with pumpkin gnocchi, followed by roast fillet of cod, clams, mussels, crisp garlic, basil, pancetta, red peppers, olives and chickpeas. Heady stuff for a 10-year-old, but she eats every scrap before I have time to stick a spoon in. The soup is earthy and the fish dish fresh and of itself, but mingling beautifully.

My starter is sumptuous: lightly curried scallops, pickled carrot and coriander, with artichoke purée and toasted coconut (£13.50). The others opt for young beets, Shepton goat's cheese, lemon thyme and rye bread (£8.50), which has an eye-popping beetroot sorbet as part of the dish, and English rose veal Holstein with a fried quail's egg, sauce gribiche and wood sorrel for £12. It's a bit like a millionaire's fried breakfast.

Each main is perfectly balanced – duck with a soft apple sauce and wintery vegetables; lamb with creamy cauliflower, garlic and aubergine; and a superb piece of bass, accompanied with a lobster raviolo and bisque, which its owner silently demolishes, repelling all incoming forks with a growl. Mains average £18, which reflects both the provenance of the ingredients and the skill assembling them.

It won't surprise you to learn that the puddings – sunken warm chocolate cake, three scoops of home-made ice-cream and a plate of English and French cheeses with hand-made crackers – are all exemplary. Even the petit fours with coffee are fabulous – with a cranachan ice-cream in a white chocolate shell getting the mmm vote.

Artichoke is some distance above a "can't be bothered to cook, let's go out" local, serious without being pompous. I advise visiting before you can't get a table at all. If necessary, move into the neighbourhood.

17/20

Scores: 1-9 stay home and cook, 10-11 needs help, 12 ok, 13 pleasant enough, 14 good, 15 very good, 16 capable of greatness, 17 special, can't wait to go back, 18 highly honourable, 19 unique and memorable, 20 as good as it gets

The Artichoke 9 Market Square, Old Amersham, Bucks, tel: 01494 726 611 Lunch and dinner. £180 for three-course lunch for four with two glasses of wine and service

Second helpings: More lunchtime legends

Le Cercle 1 Wilbraham Place, London SW1, tel: 020 7901 9999

Exquisitely presented, tiny French tapas have carved a major reputation for this elegant basement gem, near Sloane Square that does a terrific-value lunch for shoppers

Indian Summer 69 East Street, Brighton, tel: 01273 711001

An unusual twist on Indian cuisine (bordering on fusion) makes this the best in Brighton; a central spot with an excellent-value set lunch

Corse Lawn Hotel Corse Lawn, Gloucestershire, tel: 01452 780 771

Consistently good food and service makes the Hine family's village house hotel (in Queen Anne style) a popular destination; a good-value set lunch attracts particular praise from diners

Reviews extracted from 'Harden's London and UK Restaurant Guides 2010' www.hardens.com

Voices
On the last day of campaigning before the polling booths open, the SNP leader has written to voters in a final attempt to convince them to vote for independence
voicesIs a huge gamble on oil keeping the First Minister up at night?
Arts and Entertainment
Rosalind Buckland, the inspiration for Cider with Rosie died this week
booksBut what is it like to be the person who inspires a classic work of art?
Life and Style
techApple has just launched its latest mobile operating software – so what should you do first?
News
A male driver reverses his Vauxhall Astra from a tow truck
newsThe 'extremely dangerous' attempt to avoid being impounded has been heavily criticised
PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
ebooksA superb mix of recipes serving up the freshest of local produce in a delicious range of styles
Life and Style
ebooksFrom the lifespan of a slug to the distance to the Sun: answers to 500 questions from readers
Arts and Entertainment
Lionel Messi in action for Barcelona
filmWhat makes the little man tick?
Arts and Entertainment
tvReview: An undercooked end (spoiler alert)
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Pharrell dismissed the controversy surrounding
musicThe singer said 'the last thing I want to do is degrade'
Sport
Cesc Fabregas celebrates his first Chelsea goal
footballChelsea vs Schalke match report
Arts and Entertainment
Toby Jones (left) and Mackenzie Crook in BBC4’s new comedy The Detectorists
tvMackenzie Crook's 'Detectorists' makes hobby look 'dysfunctional'
Life and Style
fashion

Olympic diver has made his modelling debut for Adidas

News
i100
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Food & Drink

    IT Administrator - Graduate

    £18000 Per Annum: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: ***EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FO...

    USA/Florida Travel Consultants £30-50k OTE Essex

    Basic of £18,000 + commission, realistic OTE of £30-£50k : Ocean Holidays: Le...

    Marketing Executive / Member Services Exec

    £20 - 26k + Benefits: Guru Careers: A Marketing Executive / Member Services Ex...

    Sales Account Manager

    £15,000 - £25,000: Recruitment Genius: A fantastic opportunity has arisen for ...

    Day In a Page

    Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

    A shot in the dark

    Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
    His life, the universe and everything

    His life, the universe and everything

    New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
    Save us from small screen superheroes

    Save us from small screen superheroes

    Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
    Reach for the skies

    Reach for the skies

    From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
    These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

    12 best hotel spas in the UK

    Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
    These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

    Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

    Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
    Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

    Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

    Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
    How to make a Lego masterpiece

    How to make a Lego masterpiece

    Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
    Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

    Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

    Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
    Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

    Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

    His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam
    'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

    'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

    Exclusive extract from Janis Winehouse's poignant new memoir
    Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

    Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

    The Imitation Game, film review
    England and Roy Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption in Basel

    England and Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption

    Welbeck double puts England on the road to Euro 2016
    Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

    Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

    Pictures removed from public view as courts decide ownership
    ‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

    ‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

    Donatella Versace at New York Fashion Week