Will Dean's Ideas Factory: 'Get out of the shot, before I get you out of the shot'

 

Been to the Acropolis or Pisa or maybe Paris and found your holiday snapshot ruined by the bustling crowds?

This – hopes Swedish mobile photography developer Scalado – will one day be as stuck in the past as, er, the Acropolis. The app is called Remove and gets rid of unwanted elements, presumably whether a person, a crowd or a stray dog from your otherwise perfectly framed (in theory...) shots.

Scalado announced earlier this month that it would use annual phone fest Mobile World Congress (which takes places 27 Feb – 1 March in Barcelona) to premiere the technology.

That, of course, means that the only proof we have that it works for now comes from the glossy promo videos on Scalado's site – but we'll take their word for it. The firm has form for creating products for editing and manipulating mobile images and it's perhaps this trend, rather than the Remove gimmick itself, which has the most potential impact on how we use photography.

Previously, this kind of trickery was reserved for those with knowledge of complicated programmes like Photoshop.

If ordinary users can make such major alterations to a picture with ease (and, presumably, with little effect on the quality of the shot) the whole process of professional photo editing could one day go the way of manual typesetting. Perhaps. But if that's too grand an aim, then take comfort from all those long shoeboxed holiday shots featuring ex-girlfriends or husbands that can be dug out of the cupboard.

MoMa makes modern art of Foreclosure Land, USA

The latest cultural institution to begin thinking about the future of the suburb in the post peak-oil world is New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMa). Last summer the museum's Long Island site, MoMa PS1, asked five teams of architects and designers to come up with new ideas for refitting and redesigning America's suburbs – especially those that have been devastated by the mortgage crisis. The concepts are now on show at the exhibition Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream.

Some of the ideas include a new plan for a town in Oregon that mixes swathes of nature with houses with non-uniform green spaces and thin, car-unfriendly gaps between houses.

Another retrofitting concept proposed to fill the streets of parts of The Oranges (four suburban towns in New Jersey) with buildings, each with ground floors you can walk through. Good luck with that one... The five concepts are all fascinating.

You can read about each of the five plans in detail here: ind.pn/forearchdaily

Finding fresh bread needn't be a pain

If you've been to France, you'll have noticed the natives' fondness for a fresh baguette each morning.

But – as on this side of the Channel – small bakeries in France are struggling to survive in difficult trading conditions. The quite brilliant Edible Geography blog drew our attention to an innovative solution to the problem of hungry French people missing their morning loaf.

Rather than open a loss-making store, French baker Damien Petit has installed a number of bread "PO Boxes" in which he deposits fresh bread, pastries and papers by 9.30am every day. Petit now serves three – previously breadless – towns in south-west France. It might not be the same as a friendly baker, but it still beats a supermarket white.

Read more: ind.pn/PObreadbox

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