Nike reveals updated Fuelband SE as wearable market predicted to hit $19bn in 2018

More companies are introducing wearable devices that help users track their fitness, though Nike's leading brand position gives it an edge

Nike has revealed the second generation of its activity tracking Fuelband, with the updated device – dubbed the Fuelband SE – available in a range of colours and offering greater capacity to track its users.

The original Fuelband was launched in 2012 alongside a companion app for iOS devices. The wristband uses a bundle of sensors to record the wearer’s movements, with the app then providing daily goals through a “fuel” score.

The updated Fuelband SE includes Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity (an iteration of Bluetooth that uses less power and allows for automatic data syncing with a connected smartphone), improved sensors that can more effectively differentiate between exercise and casual movement, and the capacity to track a greater range of specific activities – including cycling, rowing and yoga.

Available in a range of colours (these are Pink, Crimson, Black and Volt – aka yellowy-green), the Fuelband SE costs £95 and can be pre-ordered ahead of its 6 November release.

Minor updates have also been made to help encourage regular activity from users. A new setting can be enabled that prompts individuals to get up and walk around once every hour, whilst “3.2.1. GO! Sessions” allows users to track how much they move in specific sessions – such as a morning run.

As well as the new colours, the hardware has also been improved to offer better water resistance (though Nike still advise against using the Fuelband in the swimming pool), although there is still no official Android companion app. Those without an Apple device will have to sync their data with a computer instead.

An update for the Nike Fuelband app adds a 'Fuel Curve' that graphs users' hourly movements. Running with the pack

However, Nike is just one player in the growing market for wearable fitness devices. A recent report from Juniper Research judged that the retail revenue of the  sector is currently $1.4bn (£878m) but this is expected to grow to $19bn by 2018.

Competitors include the Jawbone UP (a device created by industrial design star Yves Behar that doesn't include any visible display) and a range of devices created by FitBit. The most recent wearable from FitBit was launched last week, with the improved FitBit Force also showing the convergence between these wearable fitness trackers and smartwatches.

Like the Fuelband, the FitBit Force is a flexible wristband with an embedded display (OLED for the Force, LED for the Fuelband) that allows users to check the time and their current fitness stats. The Force also includes an altimeter to track climbs (be they mountains or stairs) as well as Bluetooth and NFC connectivity.

As well as dedicated wearables, there is also a slow-creep of activity sensors into mobile devices. Apple exemplified this trend with the inclusion the M7 sensor in the new iPhone 5s; this dedicated chip means the smartphone can track movement passively without draining battery power.

Many wearable devices - including the Fuelband and the FitBit Force - also allow users to track their sleep. .

PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
ebookA wonderful selection of salads, starters and mains featuring venison, grouse and other game
News
Richard Norris in GQ
mediaGQ features photo shoot with man who underwent full face transplant
News
Gardai wait for the naked man, who had gone for a skinny dip in Belfast Lough
newsTwo skinny dippers threatened with inclusion on sex offenders’ register as naturists criminalised
News
Your picture is everything in the shallow world of online dating
i100
News
The Swiss Re tower or 'Gherkin' was at one time the UK’s most expensive office when German bank IVG and private equity firm Evans Randall bought it
news
Life and Style
Attractive women on the Internet: not a myth
techOkCupid boasts about Facebook-style experiments on users
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Gadgets & Tech

    .Net/ C# Developer/ Analyst Programmer - West London

    £45000 - £50000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: .NET/ C# .Pr...

    Graduate / Trainee Recruitment Consultant - IT

    £25000 per annum + OTE £40,000: SThree: Orgtel are seeking Graduate Trainee Re...

    Content Manager - Central London

    £35000 - £40000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Content Manager - Central...

    Java Developer

    £45000 - £60000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: JAVA DEVELO...

    Day In a Page

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

    The air strikes were tragically real

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns
    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

    Britain as others see us

    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

    Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
    How did our legends really begin?

    How did our legends really begin?

    Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
    Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz
    A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

    A new Russian revolution

    Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
    Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
    Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

    Standing my ground

    If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
    Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

    Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

    The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
    The man who dared to go on holiday

    The man who dared to go on holiday

    New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

    For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
    The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

    The Guest List 2014

    Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
    Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

    Jokes on Hollywood

    With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on