Convulsion terror: Will it happen whenever she has a temperature?

Our 15-month-old daughter has just spent two nights in a children's ward after she had a convulsion, which started when she had a cold and sore throat. She had a high temperature and then started shaking and her breathing because noisy. She was unconscious, or nearly unconscious, for a couple of minutes, before the shaking stopped and she gradually came round. We called an ambulance which arrived quickly, but by then the convulsion had stopped. She was given a blood test, but nothing was found and it was put down to a high fever it was a febrile convulsion. The whole experience was very frightening, but she does not seem to have come to any harm. However, we are now terrified that the same thing will happen the next time she develops a temperature.

Pyoderma gangrenosum: From bite to ulcer

Our 36-year-old daughter-in-law is suffering from very painful pyoderma gangrenosum. Her latest outbreak followed a mosquito bite in September, and she is being treated as an outpatient. She also suffers from ulcerative colitis. Is pyoderma linked to colitis? Are there any support organisations?

Separation anxiety disorder. Is there a cure?

I suspect that I suffer from separation anxiety disorder. Is there any way I can cure myself of the continuous and suffocating fear of being alone?

Eye brows: Why are they disappearing?

Over recent years, my eyebrows have thinned to almost nothing. I think it started after I had my second baby, eight years ago I'm now in my forties. On the net, all that comes up is thyroid problems and I don't have any other symptoms, though my thyroid was tested after that baby, as I lost a lot of weight and my periods took 18 months to return. I have to draw in my eyebrows to look normal. What is causing this? And will they ever come back?

Sleep paralysis: The symptoms

This morning, I woke up terrified: a weight was pinning down my chest. I was sleeping on my back with my hands across my chest. Prior to that I was having a dream that was neither frightening or unpleasant. I was fully awake and able to think rationally. I tried to call my husband beside me, but couldn't open my mouth. I also couldn't move, but didn't feel there was anything wrong with my body it felt more like a large cat was sitting on my chest. The experience felt like it lasted for a few minutes. Is there any medical explanation for this?

Will drugs cure my candida infection?

I am breastfeeding and started to get terrible pain in the breasts after the end of the feeds. At first this was put down to cracked and infected nipples, and I was treated with Canesten cream and antibiotics. This did not help and I was told that I might have candida infection of the milk ducts. I was given a single dose of Diflucan, an antifungal drug. This did not help and I was given a longer course of Diflucan for a week. Is this likely to solve the problem?Breastfeeding blues

Driving ban: A legal or medical requirement?

I have just come out of hospital following a coronary angioplasty. I feel tired and sore, but I'm told that I will be well enough to return to work within a week or two. My concern is that after the operation the cardiac nurse advised me that I should not drive for six weeks. I can't understand why driving should be considered dangerous if I am well enough to return to work. My journey to work will be more stressful and strenuous by public transport than by car. Is the six-week ban a legal or medical requirement?

Breastfeeding: How to solve a candida infection

I am breastfeeding and started to get terrible pain in the breasts after the end of the feeds. At first this was put down to cracked and infected nipples, and I was treated with Canesten cream and antibiotics. This did not help and I was told that I might have candida infection of the milk ducts. I was given a single dose of Diflucan, an antifungal drug. This did not help and I was given a longer course of Diflucan for a week. Is this likely to solve the problem?

Periods: Heavy period causes concern

For six to nine months, my periods have been much heavier. They still appear every 28-30 days, lasting about four days, but the amount of blood has increased and there is the occasional small, dark clot. My GP says it's my age, 42. I've been told to take tranexamic acid tablets, which may have improved things a little. I don't get pain, and once the period is over I'm back to normal. A smear test was normal. My GP said my uterus felt a bit bigger than normal, which she put down to age. Am I worrying unnecessarily, or do I need to look into this?

Aspirin: Can regular use become a danger

My father, 89, buys strong indigestion tablets (Alka-Seltzer XS). He says he only takes them occasionally, but I know he takes them every day. He also takes prescription medicine for a heart condition, including a small daily dose of aspirin. The indigestion tablets also contain aspirin. Should you take such over-the-counter remedies indefinitely?

Osteoporosis: Can men suffer too?

Can men suffer from osteoporosis? My mother and aunt both suffered broken bones in old age. Most of the publicity about the disease refers to women.

Prostate infections: What's the cause?

I have had bouts of pain at the base of my penis for several months, and recently my semen was slightly brown in colour. Ibuprofen takes the pain away, but it comes back in a day or two. After urine tests and a rectal examination, I have been diagnosed with an infection of the prostate gland. The PSA blood test is slightly raised, but I was told this is due to infection, not cancer. What causes prostate infections? I have been put on antibiotics for eight weeks, which seems a long course. I am 38 years old and healthy, and I cycle at least 30 miles a week.

Brain tumour: Should it be removed?

An Independent article on 26 October on the singer Russell Watson's brain tumour was of particular interest to me. It said that all benign tumours eventually become malignant, and that to have a normal lifespan, tumours have to be surgically removed. I was diagnosed in 2002 with an acoustic neuroma, and because of my age and the small size of my tumour, I was advised to have an annual MRI scan rather than surgery. Does my tumour have to be surgically removed for me to have the chance of a normal lifespan, or not?

Smoking: Is it affecting my children's asthma?

I've had asthma since the age of four, and I think my children may have inherited my tendency, though they only get wheezy when running around. Last night they both got wheezy in the evening and during the night had croupy coughs. By morning, they were back to normal again. My doctor said they might be sensitive to cigarette smoke in the house my husband smoked about three cigarettes last night, but he was in a separate room and put a blanket at the bottom of the door to stop smoke from escaping. Could just the smell of smoke cause the children to wheeze?

Skin cancer: A recurring problem

I have just been diagnosed with skin cancer on my forehead. It is going be removed in a couple of weeks. The dermatologist has said that I will be " cured" after the operation. Can one ever be truly cured of cancer? Isn't there always a risk that it will come back, either at the original place or somewhere else in the body?

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