Condoms and Pill 'have high fail rate'

Click to follow
Indy Lifestyle Online

MORE THAN half of women in Britain who requested an abortion had been using some form of contraception when they got pregnant, according to a report.

MORE THAN half of women in Britain who requested an abortion had been using some form of contraception when they got pregnant, according to a report.

The study found ability to use contraceptives consistently and effectively did not improve with age or experience. Forty-five per cent of those 17 and under said they did not use a contraceptive when they became pregnant, the same proportion as those aged 30 to 34.

The survey, commissioned by the Department of Health and conducted by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS), showed 38 per cent of women with unwanted pregnancies had relied on condoms and 17 per cent were on the Pill.

"It is hugely important to reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies but we have to accept that abortion is a fact of life for many women," said Ann Furedi of BPAS.

The report cited factors that can render contraceptives less than 100 per cent effective, such as forgetting to take the Pill or failing to realise that its effects can be undermined by antibiotics or illness. Condoms can tear, or be forgotten.

The survey of 2,140 women who presented themselves at BPAS clinics in June showed 55 per cent of women requesting an abortion were married or in ongoing relationships.

Toni Belfield, of the Family Planning Association, said that the problem of unwanted pregnancy was exacerbated by the fact that emergency contraception, the "morning-after" pill was under-prescribed and not readily available.

Comments