'Not acceptable': Queen's Hospital Romford A&E criticised for keeping patients waiting 11 hours to be transferred to bed

 

Some patients arriving at an accident and emergency department had to wait more than 11 hours to be transferred to other parts of the hospital, a report has found.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found that the A&E department at Queen's Hospital, Romford, was still failing to protect people's safety and welfare.

They made unannounced visits in November and December to the hospital, run by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust.

They found that people using the "Majors" area who required admission were waiting far too long to be transferred to other parts of the hospital - 5% waited more than 11 hours.

The report says the trust should be aiming to transfer 95% of patients who are being admitted to wards within four hours of arrival.

The inspectors also found that some people were being nursed on trolleys when they needed to be moved into beds. People were at increased risk of pressure sores, dehydration and falls.

The "Majors" area did not have any washing facilities or storage for personal possessions, and did not offer people the privacy and dignity they are entitled to.

Elsewhere in the department, personal information - including diagnosis - was displayed where anyone, including other members of the public, could see it. There were not enough consultant or junior doctors in A&E.

The report said: "We visited the emergency department at Queen's Hospital because we had identified major concerns about the care and welfare of patients during a previous visit in March 2012.

"We carried out this inspection to ensure they had made improvements, in relation to concerns identified about meeting waiting times and delays experienced by patients in receiving care and the quality of the care they received."

Another unannounced inspection, into maternity services at the hospital, found required standards were now being met.

Matthew Trainer, deputy director of CQC in London, said: "People who need to be admitted to Queen's Hospital through A&E are waiting far too long.

"No-one should wait 11 hours' plus to be transferred to a bed, but some of the people we saw during our unannounced inspection had done just that.

"The area in which they were waiting was not set up to deliver good quality care to the standard CQC expects.

"CQC's plan is to place a legal restriction on the number of people who can be admitted to the 'Majors' part of A&E if people already there have been waiting for too long.

"This is designed to protect people from the risk of harm, and to give the trust breathing space to make the changes it needs to make.

"We are meeting the Trust Development Authority and local commissioners next week to discuss next steps."

Trust chief executive Averil Dongworth apologised to anyone who may have experienced poor care, adding: "Improving performance in our emergency departments is the biggest challenge that we face, and is the area that is receiving the most attention from all parts of the organisation."

She added: "The CQC highlights in its report that Queen's A&E department was designed to deal with 90,000 attendances a year.

"We are now seeing around 132,000 people through the doors. It also confirms that Queen's receives more blue light ambulances than any other hospital in London.

"Dealing with this volume of patients is hugely challenging and requires a joined-up approach to ensure that the trust is supported by services in the community.

"I am pleased that our GP commissioners have committed to working with us to ensure that people can find alternative care closer to home and patients who don't need to stay in hospital can go home with the right support.

"A hard-hitting action plan is in place to improve performance in A&E."

This included opening a new surgical assessment unit from next Monday, introducing direct access for GP admissions so those patients did not need to come via A&E, and fundamentally changing working patterns so there was consistent 24/7 medical cover from experienced clinicians.

Ms Dongworth added: "We are still a long way from achieving the A&E performance target, but there have been definite improvements since the CQC inspectors visited in November and December.

"However, the experience of our patients is far more important to us than a set target.

"Our frontline staff are making immediate changes - such as introducing hourly care rounds and regular meal services - to improve the care of patients."

PA

Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookPart of The Independent’s new eBook series The Great Composers
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs General

    Recruitment Genius: Lead Software Developer

    £35000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an excellent opportunit...

    Recruitment Genius: Trainee Case Handler / Probate Assistant

    £15000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Trainee Case Handler/Probate ...

    Recruitment Genius: Outbound Telesales Executive - OTE £30,000

    £16000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This precious metal refining co...

    Recruitment Genius: Senior Conveyancing Fee Earner

    £20000 - £29000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Senior Conveyancing Fee Earne...

    Day In a Page

    Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

    Climate change key in Syrian conflict

    And it will trigger more war in future
    How I outwitted the Gestapo

    How I outwitted the Gestapo

    My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
    The nation's favourite animal revealed

    The nation's favourite animal revealed

    Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
    Is this the way to get young people to vote?

    Getting young people to vote

    From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
    Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

    Poldark star Heida Reed

    'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
    The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

    The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

    Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
    Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

    Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

    Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
    Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

    David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

    The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
    Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

    Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

    Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
    With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

    Money, corruption and drugs

    The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
    America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

    150 years after it was outlawed...

    ... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
    Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

    Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

    The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
    Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

    You won't believe your eyes

    Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
    Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

    Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

    The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
    War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

    The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

    Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn