The best seafood to put on your plate

The latest study, published in October, touting the health benefits of eating fish suggests a seafood-rich diet can protect men from developing prostate cancer. But with rising mercury levels and diminishing seafood populations, what are the best types of fish to eat - for your body and for the planet?

On November 3, men's online magazine Ask Men published a roundup of some of the best types of fish to support the recommended twice-weekly diet of seafood. All of these pack a punch in terms of protein and amino acids, yet contained reduced mercury levels and have healthier populations compared to larger species, such as shark and tuna.

Sardines - Some of the most nutrient-dense food on the planet, sardines contain large amounts of omega-3 acids, which help regulate and lower blood cholesterol. Also, due to their miniscule size and short lifespan, they absorb very few contaminants and contain trace amounts of mercury.

Mackerel - One of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids (twice that of salmon) and an excellent source of selenium to boost your immune system. Mercury levels are considered low for Northern Atlantic mackerel.

Tilapia - A healthful, low-priced choice thanks to low mercury and cholesterol levels, yet it is still relatively high in omega-3s. The Environmental Protection Agency advises sticking with US-based tilapia over its Asian and Latin American counterparts.

Haddock - Popular in fish and chips, haddock contains high levels of magnesium, vitamin B6, niacin, and phosphorus.

Seaweed - A rich plant source of vitamin C, zinc, iodine, and even protein, seaweed is packed with amino acids and is said to bolster metabolism and cure impotence.

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