Valentine's Day: Disabled accessible attractions to take your loved one to on 14 February

There are plenty of exciting places to spend Valentine's Day across the country 

As heart-shaped cards and stuffed animals clutching velvet hearts have invaded shops across the country, you've likely realised that Valentine's Day is just around the corner. 

Picking where to take your loved on a date is a tricky business, particularly if either of you is living with a disability. 

Including recommendations from the Leonard Cheshire Disability charity, here are eight places to take your Valentine that are easily accessible. 

The London Eye


The London Eye is one of the most stunning and romantic ways to see some of the capital's incredible views. 

The attraction is fully accessible and you can take a carer free of charge. They also provide T-Loop in their ticket hall for people with hearing impairments and guides for visually impaired people. 

Click here for full details of accessibility on the London Eye website

Pizza Express


Pizza Express is a great go-to for some reliably good grub, and this weekend they've got an exta-special Valentine's menu.

But what sets them apart is they offer menus in both Braille and large print, and also welcome assistance dogs. It's probably best to check with the branch you choose to make sure they are wheelchair accessible though.

You can find details on Pizza Express's accessibility on their website.



Home to the UK's first digital 3D Planetarium, At-Bristol is the perfect date venue for stargazers. One reviewer on the Euan's Guide disabled access website described the accommodation for those with mobility issues as "brilliant" as there are wide doors and lots of space between exhibits. 

With advanced notice, designated wheelchair spaces can be assigned at the planetarium. 

Click here to read more about accessibility at At-Bristol.

Bolton Abbey


The historic estate in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales dates back to the 12th century, and has riverside, woodland and moorland trails to explore. Although not all of the 80 miles of footpaths are accessible, there are many which accommodate any mode of travel. 

The car park also has pletny of Blue Badge spots to park your car before you set off on your day trip. 

Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow


In the heart of the Scottish city famed for its art scene, the gallery is situated in a mansion originally built in 1780 for the tobacco businessman Lord William Cunninghame. It is the most visited modern art gallery in Scotland, and perfect for a cultured day out. 

Reviewers on Euan's Guide have praised the building for its accessibility and space inside, and advised those who use wheelchairs to look out for the ramps at either side of the building. 

The Titanic Experience, Belfast 


In the city where the ill-fated ship was built now stands the Titanic Experience museum. The attraction is spread across six floors, and features nine interactive galleries where the history of the vessel is told.

The building is fully wheelchair accessible, with lifts throughout and wide corridors. It is also features a multi-scensory experience suitable for those with hearing loss and those who are blind or partially sited. Carers, meanwhile, are given a free tickets. 

Click here to read more about accessibilty at the attraction. 

Kew Gardens


There are few places that are better for a romantic day out than Kew Gardens. There are so many beautiful plants, gardens and things to see, you'll probably want to go back again and again!

Registered blind people and carers get free entry to Kew and people with a disability get a concession on their ticket.

Find out more on the Kew Gardens disability access page.