MBA: MBAs go Dutch

Utrecht's NIMBAS offers a British qualification in foreign parts
IF YOU want a British MBA but prefer the Dutch way of life, you should opt for NIMBAS Graduate School of Management, one of the top three Dutch schools, based in Utrecht.

NIMBAS is an associate college of the University of Bradford management centre, so it offers the Bradford MBA in various guises in the Netherlands and in Germany.

When NIMBAS and Bradford struck their deal in 1988, the programmes were almost identical. Now there is more variation, though there's still a lot of contact because students at either institution may exchange during their course. All programmes are taught in English. Of the 60 students, the vast majority come from abroad, with only 12 per cent being from the Netherlands.

As is the case with most Dutch higher education institutions, NIMBAS has no campus. It is part of the University of Utrecht and is housed in an 18th-century building in a university town - the Cambridge of the Netherlands. Students can use the university's facilities. Accommodation can be difficult to find, but NIMBAS gives foreign students priority.

NIMBAS used to offer a two-year graduate programme for students wanting to take an MBA immediately after graduation. During the first year, students followed the same syllabus as those on the full-time version. In the second year they had to find a job and continue the MBA part-time. That's how Anjali Singh (see below) took her MBA. The school no longer offers this option (the Association of MBA's insists that students have to have work experience).

The school does offer specialised MBAs in environmental management, international marketing management and financial management, which involve adding extra courses to the basic MBA. It also provides in-company programmes. The full-time MBA costs between pounds 13,000 and pounds 14,000. The part-time MBA in Bonn was set up three years ago, and in Mainz last year.

On the part-time MBA in Bonn and Mainz (due to be extended to Berlin this September), students attend class every Friday evening from 5pm to 10.30pm and on alternate Saturdays from 9am to 5pm.

Lucy Hodges