Motoring: While the roofs are up, the prices are down: January may not be the time to drive a convertible, but it is the time to buy one. Steve Cropley offers a guide to the market

The snow is drifting or the rain is horizontal; the sun has gone on holiday. At this time of year, motorists are worrying about fog and ice and anti-freeze. Hardly anyone is thinking of buying a second-hand convertible. Which is why it makes sense to purchase one now.

Cars are plentiful. Dealers are pleased to see you. But most important, prices are low. Convertibles tend to hold their value much better than equivalent saloon cars, but the difference between their winter and summer prices can be several thousand pounds. Nothing will be quite so sweet next summer, as you drive along in the balmy open air, as knowing that all that motoring enjoyment came your way at a bargain price.

Michael Garrett, managing director of MJA, the Surrey-based dealer chain, specialises in off-season convertible sales. 'Our prices are keen, and we're careful to explain that it's because of the time of year,' he says. 'Soft-tops are a fashion item, at their best in summer, but we find that a surprising number of people see the sense in buying in winter.' A late-model Ford Escort 1.6i soft-top, selling at pounds 9,250 now, would cost pounds 11,000 in the summer, he says, despite being six months older. On bigger, pricier convertibles - a Saab 900 or a BMW 3-series, for instance - the savings can be even greater.

Costly insurance remains a stumbling block, however. Convertibles tend to attract higher premiums than saloons and hatchbacks of similar performance, so faster models can be very expensive to insure. But other costs need be no higher than those of a saloon car. Most convertibles are based on a well-known saloon or hatchback, so spares - and all servicing, rust- proofing and warranty details - are usually the same as the equivalent hard-top. And there is no reason why a convertible should have a shorter life than the average family car.

Over years, convertible ownership can make a lot of financial sense. A 36,000-mile, 1989 G-registration Peugeot 205 CTi, for instance, which cost about pounds 12,000 new, would be worth about pounds 6,500 next summer in a private sale. Its tin-top equivalent, the 205 GTi 1.6, which started life pounds 1,000 cheaper, would probably fetch about pounds 3,500. And when they are more than 10 years old, convertibles start appealing to classic car enthusiasts.

According to Quentin Willson, BBC-TV's Top Gear pundit and deputy editor of Car Choice magazine, winter buyers are put off by what they see as the convertible's impracticality. 'In fact,' he says, 'today's models offer near-perfect weather sealing, their heaters are powerful enough to keep the cabin snug in below-zero conditions, and even some of the cheaper ones have double roof-linings and rear window demisters.'

Besides, Willson says, on some winter days top-down motoring is perfectly feasible, provided the occupants are warmly dressed. 'A lot of motorists before the war knew no other way, and they had no heater . . .'

Nearly a dozen saloon-based convertibles are available in Britain:

Audi 80: Recently launched in Britain, so hardly any available on the second-hand market. Looks good, excellent accommodation for four, but body not very rigid and performance unimpressive.

BMW 3-series: Current model still based on the old-shape saloon (new model available in right-hand drive early next year); well-built, fun to drive, it makes a good second-hand buy, particularly the 318i (four-cylinder) or 320i (six-cylinder) versions.

Ford Escort: Good, solid all-rounder, nice to drive. Spares readily available. Two shapes, pre- and post-1989: earlier examples not as well made as the late-Eighties ones; versions badged XR3 carry high insurance premiums. Best choice: late-shape 1.6i with power hood, CD player, alloy wheels, electric windows.

Peugeot 205: Convertibles don't come prettier; designed and built at Pininfarina. Higher-performance CTi (based on GTi) easier to find, but don't dismiss sweet, soft-riding 1.4-litre CJ. Bodies durable, though they do creak and groan.

Renault 19: Recent arrival, very impressive in price and style. Not yet readily available second-hand. Insurance for quicker 1.8, 16-valve no more expensive than for saloon equivalent.

Rover 200: Compact, easy to drive, well made, relatively cheap to own. Insurance costs containable for both the 1.4- and 1.6-litre versions. Supplies just starting to reach used-car market.

Saab 900: Odd-looking, but upper models well decked out with niceties, such as power hood and auto transmission. Turbo's performance hardly necessary (attracts Porsche insurance).

Vauxhall Astra: Two models, pre- and post-1991. Earlier cars have love-it-or-hate-it styling and rather stiff suspension. Late models expensive, rare, but good. Old-shape GTEs and latest 2-litre very pricey to insure. Best buy: current shape 1.6, if you can find one.

Vauxhall Cavalier: Sold unsuccessfully in the mid-Eighties. Not very pretty; cabin too long, so rear passengers practically blown away. Hard to resell, best avoided.

Volkswagen Golf: Based on an outmoded model - still uses parts from Seventies Golf Mark I - but surprisingly nice to drive. Many versions available. Best to avoid over-ornate and fastest

Here are some hints to help you select the best:

Avoid like the plague anything that isn't a standard production model: modified cars may have leaking hoods, flexible bodies, and be prone to rot and failing the MoT.

Concentrate on low-to-middle specification cars, although a power-operated hood is worth having if it works properly. People who own them say convertibles are for cruising, not racing about, so there is no need to pay for extra power and performance.

Security: Fit a good alarm (or buy a car with one fitted), a good steering-wheel lock and a lift-out radio. Convertible insurance premiums are high because thieves find these cars easy meat.

Remember the crucial car-buying rules that apply to any purchase: make sure the person selling the car is entitled to do so; don't buy without a service history; verify the mileage by talking to the previous owner; and have the car's condition checked by experts, such as AA or RAC engineers.

(Photograph omitted)

News
election 2015The 10 best quotes of the campaign
News
A caravan being used as a polling station in Ford near Salisbury, during the 2010 election
election 2015The Independent's guide to get you through polling day
News
people
Voices
David Blunkett joins the Labour candidate for Redcar Anna Turley on a campaigning visit last month
voicesWhat I learnt from my years in government, by the former Home Secretary David Blunkett
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs General

    Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager (B2B) - Romford - £40,000 + car

    £35000 - £40000 per annum + car and benefits: Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager...

    Ashdown Group: Helpdesk Analyst - Devon - £20,000

    £18000 - £20000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Helpdesk Analyst - Devon - £20,000 ...

    Ashdown Group: Data Scientist - London - £50,000 + bonus

    £35000 - £50000 per annum + generous bonus: Ashdown Group: Business Analytics ...

    Ashdown Group: IT Project Coordinator (Software Development) - Kingston

    £45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: IT Project Coordinator (Software Dev...

    Day In a Page

    General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

    'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

    In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
    VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

    How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

    Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
    They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

    Typefaces still matter in the digital age

    A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
    Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

    'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

    New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
    The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

    Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

    Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
    Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

    Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics

    Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
    Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

    Crisp sales are in decline

    As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
    Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

    Ronald McDonald the muse

    A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
    13 best picnic blankets

    13 best picnic blankets

    Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
    Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

    Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

    Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
    Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

    Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

    Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
    General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

    Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

    He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
    General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

    On the margins

    From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
    Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

    'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

    Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
    Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

    Why patients must rely less on doctors

    Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'