UCAS: Moving into higher education

The official UCAS vacancy listings help match the grades you got with the course you want

This is the tenth edition of the most up-to-date listings available of full-time and sandwich course vacancies remaining in UK universities and colleges. The institutions are all members of the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

This is the only official national newspaper listing of vacancies. Any other lists that purport to be official should be disregarded.

The lists are compiled by UCAS from information supplied by the universities and colleges. In addition, vacancies will be available on the UCAS website (http://www.ucas.ac.uk) together with further advice relating to the Clearing procedure. There is also a vacancy service on BBC2 Ceefax pages 700-799.

Detailed Clearing instructions are sent automatically by UCAS to eligible applicants. Eligible applicants are those who have applied after 30 June 1999, those without offers from their original choices, and those who have not been offered a place after receipt of their exam results.

Vacancies are listed under subject headings. Note that these frequently do not correspond exactly with course titles. A course may appear more than once under different headings if this has been requested by the institution. It is therefore essential that applicants check details in the UCAS Handbook 1999 or on the UCAS website.

Available courses are referred to by their four-character course code. Course codes starting with a letter are degree or DipHE courses; those starting with a number are HND courses. A letter following the course code represents the campus code. The numbers in brackets, where they appear, indicate the minimum A/AS-level points score requirement.

Calculate your A/AS-level points as follows:

A-levels - Grade A, 10 points; B, eight points; C, six points; D, four points; E, two points.

AS-levels - Grade A, five points; B, four points; C, three points; D, two points: E, one point.

If no points score is indicated, applicants are advised to contact institutions regarding minimum entrance requirements. The names used in the listing correspond to those found in the UCAS Handbook 1999. Note that certain institutions have changed their names for 2000 entry.

New applicants need to complete a UCAS application form. This can be obtained from their school or college, local careers office or from UCAS itself (01242 223707).

If you have any difficulty with your Clearing application, contact UCAS on 01242 227788.

Applicants for the Clearing system must be in possession of their Clearing entry form before they can obtain a place on any of the courses listed in these pages.

See page 28 for Focus on Teacher Training

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookA delicious collection of 50 meaty main courses
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

SPONSORED FEATURES

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs General

    Recruitment Genius: Project Office Administrator

    £18000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity to join ...

    Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £35,000

    £18000 - £23000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Sales Executive is required t...

    SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

    £20000 - £25000 per annum + competitive: SThree: £20000 - £25000 per annum + c...

    Recruitment Genius: Project Coordinator

    £25000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company provides a number ...

    Day In a Page

    Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

    Solved after 200 years

    The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
    Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

    Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

    Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
    Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

    Sunken sub

    Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
    Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

    Age of the selfie

    Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
    Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

    Not so square

    How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
    Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

    Still carrying the torch

    The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
    The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

    The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

    ...but history suggests otherwise
    The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

    The bald truth

    How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
    Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

    Tour de France 2015

    Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
    Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

    A new beginning for supersonic flight?

    Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash
    I would never quit Labour, says Liz Kendall

    I would never quit party, says Liz Kendall

    Latest on the Labour leadership contest
    Froome seals second Tour de France victory

    Never mind Pinot, it’s bubbly for Froome

    Second Tour de France victory all but sealed
    Oh really? How the 'lowest form of wit' makes people brighter and more creative

    The uses of sarcasm

    'Lowest form of wit' actually makes people brighter and more creative
    A magazine editor with no vanity, and lots of flair

    No vanity, but lots of flair

    A tribute to the magazine editor Ingrid Sischy
    Foraging: How the British rediscovered their taste for chasing after wild food

    In praise of foraging

    How the British rediscovered their taste for wild food